Quote of the Week | Tom Wolfe

Well, everyone, we’ve made it to week two. First and foremost, congratulations. Between classes, assignments, and publishing events, we’ve all hit the ground running.

For returning students, the transition from summer to fall is a familiar one. For new students, many of whom have never lived – or perhaps even visited – this dense and sprawling city, the shift and pace of life can seem overwhelming and mysterious. Even the great mystery novelist Agatha Christie is reported to have said, “It is ridiculous to set a detective story in New York City. New York City is itself a detective story.”

That said, the American novelist, poet, and short story writer John Updike is renowned for having said, “The true New Yorker secretly believes that people living anywhere else have to be, in some sense, kidding.” 

These teaser quotes have paved the way for what the blog is going to spotlight today for the Quote of the Week. It is an uplifting, hopeful statement  meant to put New York City newbies – those who are familiarizing themselves with Updike’s understanding of the city’s charms – at ease.

One belongs to New York instantly. One belongs to it as
much in five minutes as in five years. “
 — Tom Wolfe


Tom Wolfe
was born in Richmond, Virginia in 1931. After studying at Washington and Lee and Yale, he became a reporter. Very early on in his career, his coverage of Cuba for The Washington Post won him the Washington Newspaper Guild’s foreign news prize. Wolfe is best known, however, for helping to bring about the New Journalism movement, in which literary techniques were combined with journalistic principles to highlight actual events. Wolfe is also the author of 14 books. His most recent novel, I Am Charlotte Simmons, was published by Picador in 2005. (Picador is a Macmillan imprint.)

For more on Tom Wolfe, check out this interview with The Daily Beast on memoirs and memory.

 

Quote of the Week | John Irving


Quotes on Education are a dime a dozen on the Internet (please excuse the cliched use of this idiom). Some are real gems, and some are too earnest to post this early-on in the year. Since we’re all embarking on our first full week of the semester, however, education seemed an apropos theme for blog one of the 2017/18 academic year. After all, as screenwriter Gene Perret once said, “Education can get you the only thing that really matters in today’s world – an assigned parking space,” and that’s why we’re all really here – to get a parking space in front of the publishing house that inspired us to apply to this program.

But Perret is not the author we’d like to feature in today’s post. Instead, let’s pivot to the best-selling novelist (and former wrestler) whose writing style has been compared to Charles Dickens by The Boston Globe.


“With every book, you go back to school. You become a student. You become
an investigative reporter. You spend a little time learning what it’s like to live in someone else’s shoes.” — John Irving

Born in Exeter, New Hampshire in 1942, John Irving wrote his first novel, Setting Free the Bears, in 1968 when he was just 26 years old. Throughout his illustrious career, Irving has had 17 books published – 14 novels, two memoirs, and one collection of short stories, although he is best known, perhaps, for his novel The Cider House Rules, which won him an Oscar in 2000 for Best Adapted Screenplay. Irving is no stranger to awards, however. His 1978 novel The World According to Garp earned the National Book award in 1980 and In One Person, his 2014 novel about a bisexual man falling in love with a transgender woman, won the Lambda Literary Award in 2013. His most recent novel, Avenue of Mysteries, was published by Simon & Schuster in 2015.

For more on John Irving’s writing process, check out his Big Think interview on “The Thrill of the Black Page.”

Quote“Anyone can hide. Facing up to things, working through them, that’s what makes you strong.”

-Sarah Dessen

Sarah Dessen is a New York Times bestselling author of over a dozen Young Adult fiction novels. Her books have been published in over thirty countries and have sold millions of copies worldwide. She has won numerous awards for her novels including the ALA “Best Fiction for Young Adults,” and the Margaret A. Edwards Award.

Dessen worked on her first novel, That Summer, while waitressing in her hometown in North Carolina. She has also taught at the University of North Carolina. Dessen’s work deals with the change in youth’s personality as they go through tragedy or loss. She writes about isolation, emotional distance among family members, and a progressive change in people’s personality, among others.

Dessen has a new novel, Once and for All, that has been released just last month called about a woman who helps brides perfect their special day, despite having lost her first love in a tragic accident. She may have a second-chance at love when she meets someone new.

Quote“Silence is the last thing the world will ever hear from me.”

-Marlee Matlin

Marlee Matlin is an American actress and the only deaf performer to ever win an Academy Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role for her work on the film, Children of a Lesser God. She has also received a Golden Globe award, 4 Emmy nominations, and made her Broadway stage debut in Spring Awakening in 2015.

Matlin, deaf since 18 months old, is also a prominent member of the National Association of the Deaf. She has also As of January 2015, Matlin also acted as the American Civil Liberties Union’s celebrity ambassador for disability rights. In 2007, Matlin was appointed to the Board of Trustees at Gallaudet University, a private university for the education of the Deaf and hard of hearing  in Washington, D.C.

Matlin has also published several books of fiction, such as Deaf Child Crossing, as well as a memoir, I’ll Scream Later, where in it she describes her drug abuse, her rocky, physically abusive relationship, and the sexual abuse she suffered as a child.

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“The goal isn’t to live forever, the goal is to create something that will.”

– Chuck Palahniuk, Diary

Chuck Palahniuk, author of the award-winning novel Fight Club, which was very famously adapted into a feature film, is an American novelist and freelance journalist. Palahniuk describes his work as “transgressional” fiction.

Palahniuk often wrote his books with distinct similarities. The characters represent people who have been marginalized in one way or another by society, and often react with self-destructive aggressiveness. Beginning with Lullaby, the style of his novels changed to mostly satirical horror stories.

Palahniuk is the recipient of the 1997 Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association Award and the 1997 Oregon Book Award for Best Novel both for Fight Club) and the 2003 Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association Award for Lullaby. He was also nominated for the 1999 Oregon Book Award for Best Novel for Survivor and the Bram Stoker Award for Best Novel for Lullaby in 2002 and Haunted in 2005.

Quote“Green was the silence, wet was the light, the month of June trembled like a butterfly.”

― Pablo Neruda, 100 Love Sonnets

Born Ricardo Eliécer Neftalí Reyes Basoalto, Pablo Neruda became known as a poet at 10 years old. Neruda wrote in various styles including: surrealist poems, a prose autobiography, and passionate love poems like his 1924 collection, Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair.

Neruda was regarded as “the greatest poet of the 20th century in any language,” by Colombian novelist Gabriel García Márquez and “one of the 26 writers central to the Western tradition” in The Western Canon by Harold Bloom. Neruda received numerous accolades including the International Peace Prize, the Lenin Peace Prize, and the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Neruda was a close advisor to Chile’s socialist President Salvador Allende and in fact, Neruda was nominated as a candidate for the Chilean presidency in 1970, but ended up giving his support to Allende, who later won the election as the first democratically elected socialist head of state.  Allende then appointed Neruda as the Chilean ambassador to France from 1970–1972.

A bust of Neruda stands on the grounds of the Organization of American States building in Washington, D.C.

“Yes: I am a dreamer. For a dreamer is one who can only find his way by moonlight, and his punishment is that he sees the dawn before the rest of the world.”

–Oscar Wilde, The Critic as Artist

Oscar Wilde, an Irish playwright, poet, and novelist, became one of London’s most popular playwrights during his time with plays such as The Importance of Being Earnest.

Wilde spoke highly of aestheticism and made attempts at several forms of literature including publishing a book poetry, lecturing on the new “English Renaissance in Art” in the United States and Canada, and became a journalist when he returned to London. Wilde became one of the best-known personalities of his day, known for his wit and flamboyant dress.

While The Importance of Being Earnest was still running in London, Wilde had the Marquess of Queensberry prosecuted for criminal libel. The Marquess was the father of Wilde’s lover, Lord Alfred Douglas. The trial revealed evidence that caused Wilde to drop his charges and led to his own arrest and trial for gross indecency with men. After two more trials, Wilde was convicted and imprisoned for two years. After he was released, Wilde left to France and began his final work, The Ballad of Reading Gaol, a long poem commemorating the harsh realities of prison life.

Quote

“I am going to leave you to make my entry into the world; — I shall be very much astonished if I enjoy myself there as I have in school.”

—Colette, Claudine à l’école (Claudine at School)

One of the greatest avant-garde authors of the 19th century, Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette—most commonly referred to as simply Colette—was a French novelist, essayist, and performer. Collete made herself into a famous creative and feminist icon by writing for a female audience, evoking passion and sensuality in her works, and for being unapologetically proud of her sexual and personal agency in a time where such a point of view was not common for women.

Her first husband took the credit for the first four books Colette wrote, the Claudine series, which were based on her own life experiences. Fortunately, though she never profited in her lifetime from her stories, she was later recognized for writing them. Colette was also able to get full-credit and copyright of all the books that she wrote after, such as her best known novel Gigi, L’ingenue libertine (The Innocent Libertine), and Cheri. Her most critically acclaimed novel is La Vagabonde (The Vagabond). She is the second woman to have ever been given the title of grand officer of the Legion of Honor, which she earned for her great influence in France.

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“And remember: you must not overwork your body, or your soul. You must not enslave yourself, as you would not enslave any other person. You must be the custodian of your self.”

 —Joyce Carol Oates, Mudwoman

Joyce Carol Oates is one of the most recognized and respected American literary writers of our time. With an extensive history of writing and reading since her childhood, Oates has published over 40 novels, memoirs, plays, and poetry. She’s been honored for her contributions to the writing community by receiving the PEN Center USA Award for Lifetime Achievement, the National Humanities Medal, PEN/Malamud Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Short Story, the Bram Stoker Award for Life Achievement, the Pushcart Prize, and many others awards.

The first widely acclaimed story Oates published (as well as her most popular work) is her 1966 short story “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been,” which was famously dedicated to Bob Dylan for inspiring the story with his song “It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue.” Other remarkable novels from Oates includes National Book Award Winner them, Oprah Book Club title We Were the Mulvaneys, Blonde, Black Water, and The Widow’s Story.

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“Whether we change our lives or do nothing, we have responded. To do nothing is to do something.”

Jonathan Safran Foer, Eating Animals

Jonathan Safran Foer is an American novelist and activist with Polish roots. Foer began to seriously pursue writing as a career after working closely with his thesis advisor, Joyce Carol Oates, during his time at Princeton. His thesis won him Princeton’s Senior Creative Writing Thesis Prize, which he then expanded and made into his first novel, Everything is Illuminated. Foer followed this up with what is perhaps his most well-known book, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, which incorporates visuals to tell a story surrounding the 9/11 tragedy. His most recent novel, Here I Am, is a fictional retelling of a family inspired by his own life. Other projects he’s worked on include his nonfiction animal rights activism book Eating Animals, and his play on Bruno Schulz‘s book The Street of Crocodiles by blocking out text to create a new story in Tree of Codes.