Link of the Week | New York Comic Con

 

This post is for Pace’s pop-culture junkies. Whether you’re a comic book connoisseur, a would-be media magnate, or a run-of-the-mill fan fanatic, Comic Con has something for you.

New York Comic Con (NYCC) is the largest pop culture convention on the east coast. An added bonus for NYC attendees is that it also takes place in Gotham City, the comic book capital of the world. More than 185,000 fans attended New York Comic Con in 2016, which made it the largest comic book and pop culture gathering in the U.S. last year. This year’s event will run from October 5–8 at the Javits Center in Midtown Manhattan at 655 West 34th Street.

2015 NYCC attendees. Image courtesy of New York Comic Con.

In addition to panels, screenings, and special events, NYCC features hundreds of guests who will be signing autographs in a designated autograph area, in Artist Alley, in private rooms, and at various booths on the show floor. A very small snapshot of guests include:

Comics:

  • Adi Granov  |  Iron Man, Star Wars: Darth Vader, Marvel Movies
  • Afua Richardson | Black Panther: World of Wakanda, Genius, All Star Batman
  • Geoff Johns | Green Lantern, DC Universe Rebirth
  • Amy Mebberson | Disney Princesses
  • Billy Martin | Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Mavel Cover Artist

Entertainment:

  • Felicity Jones | Rogue One: A Star Wars Story
  • Jason Isaacs | Harry Potter
  • Josh Hutcherson | Hunger Games, Future Man
  • Peter Capaldi | Doctor Who
  • Yetide Badaki | American Gods

Literary:

  • Jodi Meadows | Before She Ignites, My Lady Jane, The Orphan Queen duology
  • Jason Fry | Star Wars: From a Certain Point of View
  • Jonathan Hennessey | The Comic Book Story of Video Games, Alexander Hamilton: The Graphic History of an American Founding Father, The Comic Book Story of Beer
  • Rachel Ignotofsky | Women in Science, Women in Sports
  • R.L. Stine | Goosebumps
Seth Meyers at NYCC 2015. Image Courtesy of New York Comic Con.

The New York Public Library will also play a part in this year’s show.  On October 5th, from 9am–4pm, the library will host a free, ticketed event, or “professional day,” for librarians, teachers, and educators on comics and graphic novels.

We’re posting about Comic Con now because you need to get tickets early. You must also have a Fan Verification profile to attend NYCC.

Happy cosplaying!

 

Link of the Week | Brooklyn Book Festival


Alright everyone, mark your calendars tout de suite. The Brooklyn Book Festival is THIS SUNDAY, Sept. 17th at 10am at Brooklyn Borough Hall & Plaza 209 Joralemon Street in Brooklyn, NY. The largest free literary event in New York City, is a great way to “casually run into” new voices and literary powerhouses in the publishing industry. To name-drop just a few, five authors participating in the event include:

The Women’s National Book Association, NYC chapter (WNBA-NYC) and National Reading Group Month will also be exhibiting at the fair. (Pace Publishing Professor Jane Kinney Denning is the President of WNBA-National.) Located at Booth 345, they will be showcasing:

  • Membership Benefits
  • Events Calendar
  • Reading Group Guides
  • NRGM Great Group Reads Information and Lists 
  • Raffle Prizes
  • Giveaways
  •  … and more!

Member Volunteers are also needed for the festival! Volunteers will get a chance to meet new people, promote the organization, and spend time with other WNBA members. If you are interested in volunteering for the event, please register here (organizers have asked that you include times that you’re available).

Now is the best time to join the WNBA. As a member during the organization’s Centennial year, you’ll get free admission to WNBA Centennial celebrations and other publishing events throughout the season. Student membership is $20, a great value in the city for aspiring publishers and writers. For more information on membership, you can visit the WNBA membership page.

Link of the Week: The Strand Bookstore

The Strand Bookstore is a Landmark shop specializing in new, used & rare books from philosophy to finance, plus bookish gifts.

The Strand is one of New York’s most popular independent book sellers, celebrating its 90th anniversary this year. The store was founded by Benjamin Bass in 1927 and has been kept running by his son, Fred, and now Fred’s daughter, Nancy.

According to the Huffington Post article, “How The Strand Has Made Indie Bookselling Look Easy — For 90 Years,” “The store operates in a constant churn of activity ― two events a day, seven days a week; pop-up outlets around town.” The store is constantly striving to expand its footprint on the New York literary scene.

The Strand has already implemented modern shifts in how the store operates like including bookish items like tote bags and magnets as well as books. Nancy told the Huffington Post, ““Our focus is on the books,” and went on tosay. “The way we put it is, the books are the sentence and the other items are the punctuation: They’re fun and more spontaneous, and books are a little bit more of a commitment.”

The Strand continues to live on as cultural staple for the literary New York. Despite having some hiccups along the way, The Strand has managed to push on and remain successful.

Link of the Week: Barbershop Books

Barbershop Books “is a community-based program that creates child-friendly reading spaces in barbershops across America.”

Barbershop Books is the first program from the Reading Holiday Project, a nonprofit literacy organization that aims to transform the reading experience for young boys. Barbershop Books pairs the natural and significant culture of a barbershop in black communities with culturally relevant and age appropriate literature to increase out-of-school reading time among young black boys.

Alvin Irby

According to the statistics from the Department of Education found by Barbershop Books, “more than 85% of America’s black male 4th grade students are not proficient in reading.” Barbershop Books heeds this challenge by providing reading material for young black boys outside of the classroom.

During its 2nd annual Why Reading Matters conference on June 15, the National Book Foundation awarded its annual $10,000 Innovations in Reading Prize to Alvin Irby, the founder of Barbershop Books. Irby, during a breakout session at the conference, “offered a combination of formal educational pedagogy and personal anecdotes in a very funny presentation that encourages teachers and parents to think about how they present books to kids.”

Link of the Week: Book Club Central

Book Club Central, a new online resource for book clubs and readers, has a new book recommendation, No One is Going to Save Us, selected by its Honorary Chair person, Sarah Jessica Parker.

Book Club Central is a new online service for book clubs and readers to supply them with reading recommendations, book reviews, author interviews, discussion questions and more. Along with the aforementioned book pick, Parker will offer more book selections called SJP Picks.

Book Club Central is distributed by the American Library Association and have several sponsors and partners including Booklist, Libraries transform, and, big 5 publishing house, Penguin Random House.

Book Club Central also offers users the opportnity to not only search for book selection, but to lead a book club, find a new book club, and start a book club online. The site has author interviews with Colson Whitehead, Underground Railroad, and Matthew DesmondEvicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City available as well.

Link of the Week: Greenpeace

Greenpeace, a non-governmental environmental organization, focuses its campaigning on worldwide issues such as climate change, deforestation, overfishing, anti-nuclear issues, and now a long-running battle against Resolute Forest Products over the forest company’s logging practices in Canada’s boreal forest.

Greenpeace unexpectedly tabled a booth this at this year’s BookExpo. Their presence at the trade show and the subsequent ads in Publisher’s weekly were “designed to pressure Resolute to modify its forest practices and also to drop a lawsuit it brought against the environmental organization.”

Resolute Forest Products first filed a lawsuit against Greenpeace in Canada in 2013, charging the organization with defamation and economic interference. Then came another lawsuit in May 2016 in Georgia alleging RICO violations and defamation. Greenpeace believes this is an infringement on free speech and aims to silence the group and possibly other advocacy groups as well.

Greenpeace brings this issue up to publishers due to the fact that publishers are buying products from resolute Forest Productions. Greenpeace took a petition to BookExpo, that was signed by more than 100 authors, calling for publishers to stand up for free speech by opposing the Resolute lawsuits and pressure Resolute into engaging in more sustainable forest practices.

“The message isn’t that publishers are the bad guys,” Rodrigo Estrada, a spokesman for Greenpeace, said, “we want to show them we aren’t the enemy.”

Link of the Week: Subway Library

New York’s three major public library systems, the Metropolitan Transit Authority and Transit Wireless joined forces to launch Subway Library, an online service that offers free eBook downloads to subway-goers.

The six-week promotion will offer free eBooks, eShorts and excerpts from full-length novels to transit riders by simply connecting to the TransitWireless WiFi at any MTA station. These short stories and excerpts are intended to be read during short half-hour to an hour daily commutes.

Along with this promotion, a Library Train—a subway car resembling the Rose Main Reading Room inside the 42nd Street branch of the NYPL—will alternate running along the 6th and 8th Avenue corridor lines of the E and F trains. Along with the newly designed subway car is a social media challenge where riders can share photos of themselves by Subway Library posters or in the Subway Library train to win one of six possible prizes, including three Amazon Kindle Voyages.

E-books and short stories offered come from the New York Public Library’s permanent collection. Subway Library is powered by SimplyE, the free library eReader app.

Link of the Week: Penguin Random House Acquires Apparel Company, Out of Print

Penguin Random House, according to a recent article by Publishers Weekly, has just acquired the company Out of Print, which creates and sells literature themed clothing, accessories, and home goods.

Out of Print was founded in 2010 by Todd Lawton and Jeffrey LeBlanc and “is dedicated to celebrating our favorite stories while promoting literacy in underserved communities.” The company’s mission includes helping to fund literacy programs through each person made from the company. “It also supports the authors, publishers and artists who made these iconic works an integral part

Todd Lawton and Jeffrey LeBlanc

of our lives.”

Penguin Random House intends to “greatly expand its author- and imprint-brand-based merchandising capabilities.” The publisher, through this acquisition, will intend on expanding its “expertise in product sourcing, creation, licensing [and] distribution.” Authors will also be able to capitalize on the success of the retail business by incorporating it into their promotional efforts, including social media, while also building their relationships with readers.

The company, as well as its co-founders, will continue to be based out of their New York headquarters. The pair will also serve as Managing Directors for Penguin Random House, reporting to Alison Rich, VP of Publishing Innovation Development.

Link of Week: University Presses

An online interview goes into the different practices of university presses versus commercial publishers and what larger publishers can learn from them.

The Huffington Post posted an interview with Peter Dougherty, the director of the Princeton University Press, about the press’s success and growth. Over a century old, the press has evolved from being a publication aimed at only the university to attaining a global reach through digital library subscriptions and e-book adaptions. Dougherty explains how university presses tend to get overlooked and considered specialized and academic-oriented, which was true in the past, but these days they all also publish more general titles as well. He adds that university presses get overlooked in traditional advertisement spaces, such as larger bookstores and news paper columns, that a lot of their revenue and reviews come from online sources, and how imperative maintaining healthy relationships with book blogs and reviewers is for publicity.

Smaller university presses, Dougherty also mentions, are forward-thinking, and their approach to creating online digital libraries that can be accessed through subscriptions is something that larger publishers should pay attention to. Princeton University Press wants to allow anyone to access a number of titles for a set-fee, both academic and otherwise, which is much different than the typical process of publishers’ charging for one book.

Other major institutions interested in the future of digital publishing that larger publishers can learn something from include Stanford University Press, Cambridge University Press, Yale University Press, and Oxford University Press. The unity of the shifting approach to include digital publishing, and how these presses are going about handling this shift, says a lot about the direction of publishing’s possible future.

Link of the Week: Social Media Book Tags

Keeping track of social media tags for books makes it easier to follow trends and interact with other people about what’s popular in publishing.

Figuring out the tags most commonly used to share books on Instagram, Twitter, or other social media platforms can open up a lot of possibilities. Whether you’re trying to keep up with what’s popular, share what you’re reading, or market up-and-coming books getting published, the right tag can make the difference between getting noticed or slipping under the radar.

#Bookstagram on Twitter and Instagram is perhaps the most widely used hashtag for sharing all things books. Given the popularity of the tag, the community of casual to heavy #bookstagram users generates plenty of online advice on how to succesfully use and navigate the tag, which has more than 10 million posts on Instagram alone.

Other lesser-used but still popular tags include bookwormbibliophileinstabooksbooktography, booknerd, bookaholic, and booklove. Finding and including niche tags to get in touch with a particular readership, such as yalit and yafiction for Young Adult books, can also be beneficial to clicking with the right audience. Using and being aware of the tags is important on sites where the right hashtag can unlock more viewers, or the right kind of audience, versus not getting noticed at all. So keep checking out tags and seeing what works for projects that trend to stay in-the-know on tag-heavy social sites!