PW Publishing Industry Salary Survey 2017

Every year, Publishers Weekly (PW) releases an industry salary survey that highlights statistics relevant to the industry. Why should you review the 2017 survey? For anyone looking to begin their career in the industry, it helps to research the current climate and understand what you’re getting yourself into. Continue reading “PW Publishing Industry Salary Survey 2017”

Student Spotlight: Drucilla Shultz & Ann Sanchez

Drucilla Shultz and Ann Sanchez Haunt PW’s Halls

Photo courtesy of Calvin Reid. From left to right: Michael Morris, digital media coordinator and giraffe; Drucilla Shultz, bookroom editor and ghost; Ann Sanchez, intern and werewolf victim Little Red Riding Hood; and Patrick Turner, V.P. of operations.

Publishers Weekly (PW) posts a Picture of the Day in its PW Daily Newsletter. This week, it showcased the winners of the annual PW Halloween costume contest. Featured in the center are two members of the M.S. in Publishing family: Pace alumna Drucilla Shultz and current Pace student Ann Sanchez. Shultz graduated from Pace University in 2013 and currently works as PW’s bookroom editor. Sanchez is interning with PW this semester.

Publishers Weekly JobZone Relaunch

Publishers Weekly (PW) is a fundamental source of news happening in the book, magazine, and digital media publishing industries—and it’s now once again a helpful site to consult when looking for jobs.

PW has recently announced the relaunch of JobZone, an online job board aiming to assist employers looking to hire and employees looking to be hired. The site features a place to upload and search through resumes, shares resume building techniques and interview tips, and gives email notifications that alert users to specific jobs or locations for openings.

JobZone’s mission is to streamline the process of searching for jobs and applicants in publishing, which is a useful given the nature of their brand. Truly, PW JobZone has made everything about searching for jobs that much more convenient and less stressful for all parties.

PW Publishing Industry Salary Survey 2016

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Publishers Weekly has recently posted their annual Salary Survey for the Publishing Industry.

For anyone looking into careers in the publishing industry, it helps to research the current atmosphere and understand what you’re getting yourself into. The Salary Surveys are a good tool to use to see what the statistics are and what overall salaries look like so you can have a better understanding of what you should be negotiating for when you look at job offers, what job security looks like, details to better help you plan for the long-term, and so on. It’s interesting to note that the Salary Surveys seem to have similar problems every year—racial diversity is severely lacking, men make more than women, there’s an overall dissatisfaction with pay and too much work with no recognition or advancement. Perhaps if we’re more aware of these changes that need to be made, as we move into the industry we can be more cognizant of what we can do to make these statistics shift in a positive direction.

Besides Publishers Weekly, some other useful sites to consider while searching down the Google-rabbit hole for information on salaries in publishing are PayScale and GlassDoor.

The PW Publishing Salary Survey, 2013

Survey finds modest raises and a changed work environment, but optimism about the industry’s future

“The Publishers Weekly salary survey is back, and the publishing industry has undergone much change since we last conducted it, in the spring of 2010. At that time, publishing companies, and the country, were just getting back on their feet after the Great Recession, and the impact of e-books was only beginning to be felt. The 2013 survey was conducted in late summer, and the results, which are based on about 1,000 responses from publishing company employees, reveal an industry slightly more confident in its future than was the case three years ago, when the poor economy, not digital disruption, was the chief concern among respondents.”

Some interesting findings:

  • The workforce is dominated by women (76%), but men earn more overall because of higher rates of employment in management.
  • The pay gap between men and women in publishing persisted in 2012, with the average male respondent earning $85,000 per year and the average female employee earning $56,000 annually (see reasons cited in the article).
  • The workforce is also well educated: 95% of those who responded to the survey are college graduates, and 40% have either a postgraduate degree or have done some work toward a higher degree.
  • One thing the industry has going for it is that despite the turmoil of recent years, 90% of respondents said they were somewhat confident or very confident in the future of publishing.
  • Among respondents who took on new responsibilities in the last two years, 42% said their new duties were tied to digital or online developments, although only 36% said they had received training in new media. The largest portion of respondents who received digital training were from management (48%), followed by production staff (44%).
  • Self-publishing is also having an impact on the industry, according to the survey. Fifty-two percent of respondents said their companies acquired books from self-published authors in the past year; among trade publishers, that portion was higher, at 63%.

Click here to read the full article.