Quote of the Week

My childhood reading had a huge impact on me, and I think in many ways set me on a course to work in publishing…Part of the joy of the nighttime reading ritual was selecting and discussing the books with Mom. So it was when I was very little that I started to understand the pleasure that comes not just from reading books, but also from choosing them and talking about them. And that’s really what publishers do – find and spread the word about books they love.”

-Will Schwalbe, from an interview on BookRiot.comClick here to read the rest of Schwalbe’s interview.  He is the author of End of Your Life Book Club, and former SVP and Editor in Chief of Hyperion Books.

 

 

 

How Well-Read Are You?

Ever wonder how well-read you are?  A recent BookRiot article by Jeff O’Neal, Editor-in-Chief & Co-founder of the site, may be able to answer your question. In “From Zero to Well-Read in 100 Books,” O’Neal gives readers a list of books that he believes make an individual “well-read,” including classics like To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee and Moby Dick by Herman Melville, and modern bestsellers like The DaVinci Code by Dan Brown and Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn.

 

” “Well-read,” O’Neal writes, “for this person then has a number of connotations: a familiarity with the monuments of Western literature, an at least passing interest in the high-points of world literature, a willingness to experience a breadth of genres, a special interest in the work of one’s immediate culture, a desire to share in the same reading experiences of many other readers, and an emphasis on the writing of the current day.”

 

Click here to see how many books you can cross off O’Neal’s list.  I have 18 read so far and am looking forward to catching up on my new, summer reading list! Comment with your book number and share your thoughts about the titles that made the cut with your classmates!

 

Special thanks goes to student, Miguel Cervantes, for first posting this article in the “Pace Publishing Pack” Facebook group!  If you are a current or alumni MS in Publishing student with an active Facebook account, consider becoming part of the Publishing Pack to learn more about the program and your fellow classmates.

Quote of the Week

 “In magazine publishing, there’s nothing more exciting than the “launch.” Not many other things in business come close to this kind of adrenaline rush…“Inventing” a magazine is much more personal than inventing a lawn mower or a toothbrush. It’s more revealing of who you are; it’s an extension of your personality. There’s a lot of you between those pages.  So the fear of rejection is greater.”

 

-Samir A. Husni, Ph.D., a.k.a “Mr. Magazine”

Faculty in the Spotlight

Faculty in the Spotlight: Prof. Paul Levitz

 

Seemed like a good idea—start the new class on Transmedia and the Future of Publishing with eight dirty words.  Okay, it’s one more than it took George Carlin, but there’s been some inflation since 1972, hasn’t there?

 

It’s educational; unlike Carlin’s selection, these are words that at least some of the students don’t have in their vocabulary.  It’s on point to the theme of the course; these are words that describe the changes that are wracking publishing and will play a role in its future.  And like any effective use of a dirty word or two, it rachets up the stakes of the conversation.

 

Eight dirty words:

 

Decentralization, Distintermediation, Fragmentation, Branding, Curation,

Gatekeepers, Transmedia and Transcreation.

 

The underlying lesson is that students working on their M.S. in Publishing in this fine twenty-first century need to think about their fundamental skills more than the fixed form which is the end product containing their work.  Skills like discovering, nurturing and shaping the work of creative people; managing the process by which work is created and made accessible to an audience; motivating and connecting an audience; and ultimately doing it all within financial disciplines that enable it to be done for the benefit of all concerned.  These skills will survive and thrive, even if the jobs they’re performed in won’t necessarily be labeled editor, production manager, publicist, or accountant (okay, odds are the accountant label will continue long after all the others, I concede).  People may choose to get their entertainment and information on screens, or even holographic glasses, rather than paper neatly bound in a printing plant, but they’ll still need us along the way.

 

So let’s look at some words rarely heard in the halls of book and magazine publishers, where the worst dirty word used to be “Returns.”  Let’s explore the forces changing around us, and avoid the textbook error long taught in M.B.A. programs down the hall: the moment when railroads decided they were in the railroad business, not the transportation business.  Welcome to the future, complete with a new set of dirty words.

News from the French Building

The MS in Publishing Blog would like to take this time to introduce our new feature, News from the French Building!   This section of the blog encourages Alumni, Faculty and Advisory Board members to share news about their publications, new jobs, recent successes, promotions and positions on boards with blog readers.  Anyone interested in submitting to this feature should contact Prof. Jane Denning at jdenning@pace.edu or the Publishing Office email account, puboffice@pace.edu.

 

We look forward to reading about all of your continued success!  Below are the first installments to this feature from recent program graduates, Hannah Bennett and Lisa Hartman.

 

Hannah Bennett graduated from the MS in Publishing program in December 2012. She interned with RosettaBooks during her last semester in the program, and began working with them full-time in January as the Production and Distribution Associate.  RosettaBooks is a leading independent ebook publisher, annually selling over 1,000,000 ebooks worldwide. Hannah’s job entails the quality assurance of ebooks, including working with digitizers and proofreaders to ensure the best possible products. RosettaBooks is a small and growing company, and Hannah is excited to be working with a forward-thinking company and expanding her knowledge of the ebook business.

 

 

“After spending the majority of my time in NYC while completing the MS in Publishing degree from Pace, I relocated back to my hometown of Columbia, Missouri in December for my final semester of the program. I was offered a position with Missouri.com, a start-up online magazine that highlights each major city and its culture. I was brought in as a Marketing Consultant for Columbia where I’ll be selling our digital marketing services to local business owners as well as help them set up their profiles on Missouri.com. Additionally, they decided to keep me involved in the design process of client websites and marketing materials based on my publishing background. Since Missouri.com was only launched two months ago, we will eventually be working together to further develop the editorial mission of the site and potentially begin writing feature articles for the city of Columbia. I’m so grateful for this opportunity and extremely excited to be involved in the creative process for Missouri.com.” -Lisa Hartman  http://missouri.com/columbia.