Link of the Week | Brooklyn Book Festival

 

The Brooklyn Book Festival (BKBF) is one of the biggest festivals in New York City and this year it is featuring over 300 authors. Originally meant to showcase the unique “voice” of Brooklyn, because of the variety of authors that resided there, the event has taken off allowing other authors outside of Brooklyn to be celebrated as well.

The Festival starts on Monday, September 10 and will primarily be in downtown Brooklyn. There will be different panels, themed readings, author signings, and vendors that will be present. More recently, the festival has gown to include two special days during the festival: Children’s Day (Saturday, September 15) and Festival Day (Sunday, September 16th).

They are also presenting the Bobi Award, which is the Best of Brooklyn award for the author “whose work best exemplifies or speaks to the spirit of Brooklyn”. This year, the winner is N.K Jemisin who is the first author to win with speculative fiction.

The full schedule for the Brooklyn Book Festival can be found here.

Link of the Week: Cave Canem to Receive NBF Literarian Award

 

This week’s link takes a look at how the National Book Foundation (NBF) has announced that they will be honoring  Cave Canem with Literarian Award for Outstanding Service to the American Literary Community at this year’s National Book Award Ceremony.

Cave Canem is a non-profit center located in Brooklyn, NY that commits itself to supporting and encouraging black poets and literary writers. logoAccording to NBF’s website, the Literarian Award is given to “an individual for outstanding service to the American literary community, whose life and work exemplify the goals of the National Book Foundation to expand the audience for literature and to enhance the cultural value of literature in America.” This will be the first time this award was given to an organization and not an individual person.

The NBF is a non-profit organization that made it their mission to bring more attention and appreciation to great literary writers, poets, and works in America. The National Book Award Ceremony is something the NBF describes as being for books what the Oscars are for movies. The ceremony will be held on November 16 in New York, New York.

Link of the Week

Hachette, Booktrack Partner to Offer Teens E-Books with Music

hachette_book_logoWhen reading a book did you ever wish there was a soundtrack you can listen to as you read? Well Hachette is making it happen. They partnered with Bookrack, a technology platform offering customizable soundtracks and sound effects for e-books, to supply movie-like soundtracks for its popular e-books for teens. This is a great example of publisher embracing change and taking a risk.

Click the link to learn more.

Link of the Week: HarperCollins Publishers

HARPERCOLLINS PUBLISHERS LOGOThis week HarperCollins Publishers announced they are launching a daily Facebook Live program. The program is being led by our 2016-17 David J. Pecker Distinguished Professor, Lisa Sharkey. The Wall Street Journal reported the news and the article features Sharkey explaining the goals of the new program. Read the article here.

Each day of the week will have a different theme. For more details on the themes and the overall program take a look at HarperCollin’s press release here. The current line-up of authors also includes: Rumaan Alam, Bobby Bones, Jessie Burton, Rachel Felder, Dorothea Benton Frank, Melissa Fay Greene, Michael Harvey, Betsy Lerner, Peggy Orenstein, Rob Sheffield and Simon Van Booy to name a few.

Link of the Week: Harper Lee’s Christmas

how-a-thoughtful-christmas-present-helped-harper-lee-write-to-kill-a-mockingbird Harper Lee wrote a piece for McCall’s magazine in the December 1961 issue, titled Christmas To Me. The Guardian brought it back to life. The story is about a Christmas from her past in New York back in the 1950s. The events led to the creation of To Kill a Mockingbird and Go Set a Watchman. 

Several years ago, I was living in New York and working for an airline, so I never got home to Alabama for Christmas – if, indeed, I got the day off. To a displaced southerner, Christmas in New York can be rather a melancholy occasion, not because the scene is strange to one far from home, but because it is familiar: New York shoppers evince the same singleness of purpose as slow-moving southerners; Salvation Army bands and Christmas carols are alike the world over; at that time of year, New York streets shine wet with the same gentle farmer’s rain that soaks Alabama’s winter fields. I missed Christmas away from home, I thought. What I really missed was a memory, an old memory of people long since gone, of my grandparents’ house bursting with cousins, smilax and holly.

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