Around Town | Dec. 12th – Dec. 18th

Since the holidays are almost upon us, here are some great events to get you into the holiday spirit! (If the snow on Saturday didn’t already hype you up.) Continue reading “Around Town | Dec. 12th – Dec. 18th”

Searching for John Hughes: Jason Diamond & Dana Schwartz

diamond_sliderbFriday, December 9 at 7:00 pm

McNally Jackson
52 Prince St.,
New York, NY

Searching for John Hughes: Or Everything I Thought I Needed to Know about Life I Learned from Watching 80s Movies, is the first book by Jason Diamond, the founder of Vol. 1 Brooklyn, whose writing has appeared in the New York Times, The Paris Review, Pitchfork, Vice, Bookforum, McSweeney’s, and many other publications. Searching for John Hughes is Diamond’s hilarious and poignant memoir of how a Jewish kid from a broken home in a Chicago suburb—sometimes homeless, always restless—found comfort and connection in the likewise broken lives in the suburban Chicago of John Hughes’ oeuvre. “With geniality, humor and charm, Diamond explores the ways in which cinematic fantasy can influence, overshadow, and help us to escape reality. This book is for anyone playing out an eternal adolescence,” says Melissa Broder. He will be joined by Dana Schwartz, an Arts & Entertainment writer at The Observer.

Admission is free.

What the Dickens? Seventh Annual ‘A Christmas Carol’ Marathon, sponsored by Penguin Classics

screen-shot-2016-12-08-at-12-19-20-pmSaturday, December 10,  from 1:00 pm to 4:30 pm

Bookstore Cafe
126 Crosby Street New York, NY

Join dozens of terrific writers and performers for a reading of Charles Dickens’s holiday classic, “A Christmas Carol,” sponsored by Penguin Classics.

Drop in early and often to catch a few surprise performers or linger through the afternoon for the whole, spirited tale. All books and 15107461_10155411155134386_6144932288096472674_nmerchandise are 10% off, and the cafe will be stocked with seasonal specials. Finish your Christmas shopping with unique literary finds, have some festive treats from our cafe with a hot cocoa or a glass of wine and enjoy!

Festivities will kick off at noon with Christmas caroling from members of the New York City Master Chorale. The reading of “A Christmas Carol” will begin at 1 PM inside the bookstore and end approximately 4:30PM. Note: Special holiday hours for Saturday, December 10: 10AM – 6PM.

Admission is free. If you are interested in attending, please RSVP on Facebook.

The Gefilte Manifesto: New Recipes for Old World Jewish Foods

gefilte-3d2Tuesday, December 13 at 6:30 pm

Mid-Manhattan Library
455 Fifth Avenue

New York, NY

This illustrated lecture explores the authors’ mission to revitalize Ashkenazi cuisine with recipes that draw inspiration from Jewish bakeries, neighborhood delis, old-fashioned pickle shops, and their own childhood kitchens.

With Jeffrey Yoskowitz and Liz Alpern, cofounders of The Gefilteria.

Admission is free and on a first come, first served basis.

Link of the Week: Harper Lee’s Christmas

how-a-thoughtful-christmas-present-helped-harper-lee-write-to-kill-a-mockingbird Harper Lee wrote a piece for McCall’s magazine in the December 1961 issue, titled Christmas To Me. The Guardian brought it back to life. The story is about a Christmas from her past in New York back in the 1950s. The events led to the creation of To Kill a Mockingbird and Go Set a Watchman. 

Several years ago, I was living in New York and working for an airline, so I never got home to Alabama for Christmas – if, indeed, I got the day off. To a displaced southerner, Christmas in New York can be rather a melancholy occasion, not because the scene is strange to one far from home, but because it is familiar: New York shoppers evince the same singleness of purpose as slow-moving southerners; Salvation Army bands and Christmas carols are alike the world over; at that time of year, New York streets shine wet with the same gentle farmer’s rain that soaks Alabama’s winter fields. I missed Christmas away from home, I thought. What I really missed was a memory, an old memory of people long since gone, of my grandparents’ house bursting with cousins, smilax and holly.

Click here to continue reading.

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Link of the Week: Giving Thanks to Libraries

It’s finally that time of year again, the one filled with turkey and stuffing, cranberry sauce, and pumpkin pie. Of course, Thanksgiving isn’t just about the food. It is about being thankful for all the things that are meaningful in our lives. This includes family and friends, and for us Publishing students, reading and words. If you are staying in New York City for the holiday, why not take this opportunity to explore one of our city’s beautiful libraries? The plethora of words and the smell of old books will warm you right up. There are many library locations here in Manhattan to explore.

Several library exhibitions are currently available to view as well. One exhibition includes “Dearest Jackie:” On the Death of JFK. Although it is not an exhibition to boost your mood, it is one of historical importance. November 22, 2013 marked the 50th anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s death. The exhibit “features the work of 20th-century masters Andy Warhol and Robert Rauschenberg, as well as a heart-wrenching photograph by the great Elliott Erwitt. At the heart of the exhibition is a poignant condolence letter to Jacqueline Kennedy from Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., written within hours of the assassination. An intimate associate of both Kennedy and the First Lady, Schlesinger puts into words the grief and despair of a nation.” This exhibition takes place at the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building in the McGraw Rotunda and goes until Sunday December 1.

If you need something to put you in the holiday spirit, then the exhibition “A Literary Christmas Miscellany from the Berg Collection” might be a better fit for you. This exhibition features Charles Dicken’s prompt copy of A Christmas Carol, from which he gave his public readings of the story. The exhibit also features a book with a Christmas theme by T.S. Eliot, and Christmas readings by James Joyce, Sean O’Casey, E.E. Cummings, and Maurice Sendack. You can also see a photograph of Dicken’s eldest sister’s son who is said to have been the inspiration for Tiny Tim. This exhibition is open until January 5, 2014 at the Stephan A. Schwarzman Building in the Deborah, Jonathan F. P., Samuel Priest, and Adam R. Rose Main Reading Room.

This Thanksgiving, let history and books surround you, and remember to be thankful that they are one of the reasons you are here at Pace today.