Link of the Week: Greenpeace

Greenpeace, a non-governmental environmental organization, focuses its campaigning on worldwide issues such as climate change, deforestation, overfishing, anti-nuclear issues, and now a long-running battle against Resolute Forest Products over the forest company’s logging practices in Canada’s boreal forest.

Greenpeace unexpectedly tabled a booth this at this year’s BookExpo. Their presence at the trade show and the subsequent ads in Publisher’s weekly were “designed to pressure Resolute to modify its forest practices and also to drop a lawsuit it brought against the environmental organization.”

Resolute Forest Products first filed a lawsuit against Greenpeace in Canada in 2013, charging the organization with defamation and economic interference. Then came another lawsuit in May 2016 in Georgia alleging RICO violations and defamation. Greenpeace believes this is an infringement on free speech and aims to silence the group and possibly other advocacy groups as well.

Greenpeace brings this issue up to publishers due to the fact that publishers are buying products from resolute Forest Productions. Greenpeace took a petition to BookExpo, that was signed by more than 100 authors, calling for publishers to stand up for free speech by opposing the Resolute lawsuits and pressure Resolute into engaging in more sustainable forest practices.

“The message isn’t that publishers are the bad guys,” Rodrigo Estrada, a spokesman for Greenpeace, said, “we want to show them we aren’t the enemy.”

BookExpo America 2017- A First Time Experience

BookExpo America is where Publishing Professionals gather to exchange valued information on new titles, breakout authors, and many, many ARCs. As a first-timer to this trade show event, it is very overwhelming at first glance. Left and right, ARCs are being signed and distributed. Major publishing houses like Macmillan and HarperCollins are represented in whole sections decorated with large rugs and smaller companies are housed within booths throughout the show floor.

As someone who is experiencing BookExpo for the first time, I thought it best to take a second to look around and get a good feel of what is going on around me. It is easy to get lost in the shuffle and it is important to soak it all in. If you have a short window to visit BookExpo, as I did, then you should not take too much time soaking it in. After I walked around for a bit, I made sure to network with publishers such as Soho Press, Penguin Random House, and Arcadia Publishing. I saw this as a learning opportunity, a chance to network, and a fun event all wrapped into one.

I made sure to heed Professor Richter’s advice and checked out what events were happening on each day of BookExpo and also brought in my own bag to carry all the free stuff in, though I was given a free tote as soon as I stepped into the building. I ended up going with 17 new books and a sore shoulder. Nevertheless, it was exciting to meet publishing professionals and authors who all gave me advice and encouragement on my future publishing endeavors.

The Adult Book Editors’ Buzz Panel

There are a wide range of people to meet, events to participate in, and books to obtain. Everywhere you look, there are people mingling, trading business cards, and sharing stories and information that will benefit their publishing careers. I can only imagine how attending BookExpo as a publishing professional will differ from my experience as a student.

Of course, this is just my experience. Articles from the Tampa Bay Times, and the Star tribune offer more insight what is was like at this year’s BookExpo.