Welcome back to Pace University |

Professor Jane Denning


Welcome back to the Fall 2017 Semester,

I hope you all had a restful summer break and that you are ready for an exciting semester in the M.S. in Publishing program!

Be sure to check out the blog daily as we are always updating it with great information for M.S. in Publishing students and alumni. We start off each week with an inspiring Quote of the Week. Other regular weekly features include: The Link of the Week, Jobs of the Week, and Around Town: Books and Magazine Events in NYC. We also post monthly Alumni in the Spotlight Interviews, Faculty/Advisory Board in the Spotlight features, Reports from the Trenches (we love to have students blog about field trips, guest lectures, books or magazines they have read etc., so please don’t hesitate to contact me if you want to contribute), and Volunteer and Events postings.

We also post numerous Internship and Employment opportunities, so be sure to bookmark the blog. As you embark on your internship search, don’t forget to go to the Internship Resources (Book and Magazine) tab on the blog. We have been working hard to update this resource and there are great links here to assist you with your search. We are also in the process of developing a robust Career Resources tab on the blog that will host useful information on resume and cover letter writing and job searching and networking, so check back often! And, if you are looking to do an internship and take PUB 699A and B, please email me anytime at jdenning@pace.edu to set up a time to meet.

The blog also includes our Faculty and Staff Bios—a great way to learn more about the backgrounds and accomplishments of your professors and publishing staff! The Publishing Links that run along the right side of the blog are also a great resource for students and publishing professionals.

I would also like to take this time to thank you for your future contributions to and feedback on the blog. We hope that you are finding it a useful resource. Please feel free to email me with any suggestions or comments.

We love to hear from you and are always looking for new ways to provide you with useful information. And, for students interested in publishing some writing samples, putting together a post for the blog is a great way to do that.

With best regards,

Executive Director of Internships and Corporate Outreach
Blog Editor
http://mspub.blogs.pace.edu/
Adjunct Professor
Pace University
MS in Publishing
551 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10176
212-346-1404

President WNBA-National
http://www.wnba-books.org

Immediate Past President, Women’s National Book Association-NYC
http://www.wnba-nyc.org/ | http://wnba-nyc.org/blog/

Link of the Week: WordRates

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A brand new resource was launched on October 19th, Wordrates.com. WordRates is a publishing platform for journalists to share payment structures, rate editors, and sell pitches. The project was launched on Kickstarter in April 2015 and by May 24,2015 the project reached its goal. They raised almost $10,000. Writer Scott Carney founded the site to bring transparency to the Byzantine world of magazine publishing.

According to Galleycat:

The site contains a database of magazines, blogs and newspapers that work with freelance writers. The entries for these publications include crowd-sourced ratings and comments from writers on the publication, as well as ratings of individual editors. In addition, if you sign up for the free membership, you can access publication details like pay rates, kill fees and advertising rates, along with masthead information. If you sign up for a premium account ($35 for six months, $50 a year), then you can access contact details for individual editors. You can also browse the site by best rated (Wired, Outside, Fast Company) or lowest rated (Details, Town & Country, Allure) or newest/oldest.

One special feature is the Pitchlab. On the site it explains that Pitchlab is where “Writers with great ideas can submit pitches, which are then reviewed by our team of mentors. If the idea passes the review process, the mentor will then work with the writer to hone the proposal into a perfect pitch and then take it out to the marketplace to find an appropriate publication, just like a literary agent does in the book publishing world.”

The site has been described as “Yelp for journalists.”

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Jordan Forney is a Graduate Assistant for the M.S. in Publishing program at Pace University. She is currently pursuing a career in the book publishing industry. She’s a proud alumnus of Seton Hill University and calls the United States Virgin Islands home. 

Link of the Week: Bookforum

 

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One of my favorite book sites to visit is Book Riot (BR). Hands down, it has one of the best communities of readers that I’ve come across, and the content produced for that site is rich and comes from a diversity of voices. BR describes themselves as such:

  1. BookRiotCircleWe create.
  2. We always prefer the book to the movie.
  3. We riot as a team.
  4. We geek out on books, embarrassingly so.
  5. We’re leaders.
  6. We practice charity.
  7. We miss our subway stop cause the book is that good.
  8. We are non-traditional.
  9. We believe in family (bookshelves and cats count).

Not only does BR provide book reviews and a wide assortment of discussion columns, it also provides podcasts and sets up some events for readers and others who are in the reading/writing community. This is a particularly helpful resource when it comes to finding feedback on recent happenings in the book world, and joining discussions on trends or particular books. The voices put on display in the pages of Book Riot’s website are diverse, which creates a good context for productive conversations.

 

Internship Alert: Difference Press

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Difference Press is looking for an Editorial Intern, to join its growing editorial department. This is a part-time virtual position, which will allow the candidate access to the editorial, design, sales, marketing and administrative teams in order to learn the business from multiple angles.

We are looking for a team player to assist our talented managers with several projects including

  • Gather, analyze and collate data relevant to our authors for use within the Difference Press book creation process
  • Complete competitive analysis of published books and update and refresh various database listings of titles
  • Create and share original research from our author community
  • Work with existing editorial team to scope and document the developmental editing role.
  • Provide strategic support for authors and authors-in-transformation as needed

The successful candidate has:

  • Strong desire to learn the publishing industry
  • Interest in different business models and the changing landscape of publishing
  • Desire to grow their career with a quickly moving company
  • Experience in social media, marketing, and project management
  • Can do /motivated / entrepreneurial attitude
  • Commitment to making a difference
  • Experience with life coaching or positive psychology

Must be passionate about 1 of Difference Press’ 5 non-fiction editorial focuses:

1. Self Help/ Personal Growth

2. How to

3. Business

4. Memoir

5. Spiritual

 

Please review www.DifferencePress.com and www.TheAuthorIncubator.com before applying.

 

To apply, send your resume along with a cover letter or intro video to Angela@TheAuthorIncubator.com include: 

(1) EXACTLY what skills and interests make you the BEST for this job.  Just sending a short “I am available” or a lone resume will probably get overlooked.

(2) SPECIFICALLY when you can start and what you would like your summer schedule to be.

(3) PRECISELY and CONCISELY what your favorite book is and why you love it.

Thanks & Good Luck!

Link of the Week: Literature for the Halibut

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Screen Shot 2015-04-15 at 4.44.31 PMReading is something that ought to be done every day, but we all have days when we’re too busy to delve into the pages of a book. Whether we are running around doing errands or traveling, there’s time to listen, at the very least, to books or podcasts. But there’s also the option to listen to radio shows. I know, I know… who listens to radios these days? The good thing is, radio shows aren’t necessarily limited to the radio waves anymore! Much like a podcast, a radio show can stream or the archives can be downloaded for later listening.

One such radio show that may interest you bookish people is Literature for the Halibut, where Ann Haubrich, Jason Braun, Nicky Rainey and MK Stallings take listeners on a “literary fishing excursion.” From 9-10pm every Monday night, KDHX broadcasts literary nibbles or excerpts, all of which can be accessed on their website archive here.

Take a listen!

Link of the Week! VIDA: Women in Literary Arts

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Equality for women in the workplace, and in society at large, has been an issue for a long time now. Movements have come and gone, bringing change to our world. One of publishing’s shortcomings is the imbalance of men and women in high leadership positions, and further, a lack of diversity.

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One volunteer group has been tackling the issue of awareness head-on. VIDA is “a research-driven organization” that strives to “increase critical attention to contemporary women’s writing as well as further transparency around gender equality issues in contemporary literary culture” (Source). Every year, this group collects data from “Tier 1” journals, publications, and other top literary presses in order to represent, in hard numbers, the disparities among writers and other participants of the literary world.

The VIDA Count reveals major imbalances at premiere publications both in the US and abroad. For example: The New York Review of Books covered 306 titles by men in 2010 and only 59 by women; The New York Times Book Review covered 524 books by men compared to 283 books written by women (VIDA Count 2010). ~About VIDA

The VIDA count has been an annual event since 2010; a little earlier in the week the 2014 results were published. For the first time, the VIDA conducted a Women of Color count, and for the second year a Larger Literary Landscape count. Read the full report here. The efforts that VIDA is making to illuminate the disparities in the literary world is bringing awareness to a wide population, and hopefully change to balance the inequalities.

 

Click here to find out more about VIDA!

 

 

Link of the Week: The Writer’s Almanac

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An almanac is traditionally classified as an annual publication or “an annual calendar containing important dates and statistical information such as astronomical data and tide tables.” They provide a place to consolidate information so that it can be easily accessible to those who want it.

The Writer’s Almanac features daily updates that follow “on this day in history” highlights, like those that you might find in a newspaper. In the case of the WA, subscribers or site visitors can read (or listen to) a few poems and historical highlights pertaining to literature and the authors of it. The host of the WA also features famous authors on their birthdays, and details their work and lives.

You can subscribe to the email list, follow them on Twitter or Facebook, or download their podcasts from iTunes, the Swell app, or iHeartRadio for iPhone and Android.

Also on the WA website, you can find a series of interviews with poets. Take some time to read about these authors and their work!

 

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Link of the Week: Penguin’s “Wheel of Fortune”

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This year Penguin is turning 80, and as with most big milestone birthdays, it’s not a surprise that the company wants to do something big to commemorate the event.

Eighty years is a long time to be in business, and even with the merger with Random House, Penguin has a legacy to celebrate. This year, they’re incorporating the digital side of publishing, showing the world that they’re taking steps to become integrated and relevant.

Penguin has launched an interactive website that introduces users to 80 classical works.

 

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Click Here to check out the official Little Black Classics webpage.

By dragging or clicking the Penguin “selection tool,” users are introduced to titles with a quote from the title they land on and the option to purchase it as either a Mass Market paperback or eBook. Users can also share their finds on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

More than anything, Penguin is showing itself capable of engaging readers in the digital age, and interested in

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moving forward with new ideas and approaches to bookselling. It may be hard for old companies to adjust to change, especially the change happening so quickly these days, but Penguin is making a salient effort that demands they be paid attention to.

 

Click here for further reading on Penguin’s history of changing the book world.

Link of the Week: Scribner’s New Online Magazine

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Originally launched in 1887, Scribner Magazine introduced new authors and published short form pieces by the authors who were published by Scribner, such as Henry James, Edith Wharton, Theodore Roosevelt, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Ernest Hemingway. In 1939, the magazine discontinued its circulation due to low numbers (in comparison to Atlantic Monthly and Harper’s Monthly).

Today, Scribner has announced the relaunch of the magazine, but this time, in a digital format. In keeping with its original purpose, the new Scribner Magazine intends to “pull back the curtain, to reveal a more intimate look at writers and publishers: where writers work, the music they listen to, the seeds of their books” (Source).

 

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Click to visit the Magazine

 

According to Publishers Weekly, “The online magazine will include original writing and interactive media, prose and audiobook excerpts, photo galleries, author-curated music playlists, bookseller reviews, and insider looks at the world of publishing. The first edition kicks off with an essay from Anthony Doerr, about the writing of his novel, All The Light We Cannot See, a 2014 National Book Award finalist” (Source).
Take some time to check out the articles and reviews in the magazine!

Link of the Week: Blurb and Self-publishing Revenue

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How extensively do companies that accommodate the increasing number of self-publishers change the industry landscape? Do they change it at all? Platforms like Amazon’s CreateSpace, Lulu, or iBooks from Apple, make self-publishing a more viable option than it once used to be, but does the existence of these options threaten traditional publishing? Maybe, maybe not. If anything, they highlight the selectivity of big publishers and encourage the creative produce from an untapped source. Understandably, big publishers can’t, from a business standpoint, take a risk on everyone they come across, even if an author shows promise, but are there ways they can make themselves more relevant to a growing pool of writers?

Screen Shot 2014-11-05 at 4.59.51 PMWhether traditional publishers step up their game or not, companies that support self-publishers are upping theirs. In addition to the few I’ve already mentioned, Blurb has been developing resources for authors, and surprisingly, the commercial segment of the industry.

An article published in The Telegraph by Andrew Cave highlights Eileen Gittins and her work with Blurb, and the way the company has grown since 2005. The company is entirely online and outsources its warehousing and production.

When set beside CreateSpace and Lulu, Blurb may not be a clear stand-out when it comes to self-publishing, but the fact of the matter is, the company is growing and is following the needs of the users. Until reading the Telegraph article, I hadn’t considered how self-publishing platforms could accommodate commercially for film companies or others that require photo-heavy productions. Is this a new source for revenue that publishers can take into consideration or not?