FOLIO: Media Next Conference

A number of Pace MS in Publishing students had the unique opportunity to volunteer and to attend the FOLIO: media NEXT conference that took place in New York the last week of October.  In addition, Prof. Andrea Baron, Prof. Manuela Soares and Prof. Jane Denning were also able to attend.

Pace MS in Publishing student Maira Roman says, “Volunteering at Folio: MediaNext was a great opportunity to meet new people from Folio magazine and also to watch the presentations. It was good to see all the exhibitors and how they are engaged to think and build the future of magazine and book publishing.”

Tony Silber, the general manager of Folio:, Min, Expo, PR News and Audience Development,  and Jenn Heinold, Vice President, Events, Access Intelligence, generously provided us with this wonderful opportunity and we all learned a great deal about some of the issues, challenges and opportunities currently facing the magazine publishing industry.  It was an incredible opportunity for us to hear from key industry leaders about how they are transitioning their businesses in the digital age, to learn about new trends and strategies regarding  content management and social media.

Jenn Heinold
The conference was organized around five tracks—Media Management, MediaContent, MediaRevenue, MediaMarketing and MobileNext—and close to 100 speakers are on hand to guide you through today’s biggest opportunities: Mobile, tablets, social and transforming magazine publishing into a media model for a new era.  Click here for full descriptions of each track.

The speakers at the conference were an impressive and prestigious group of industry professionals, and included Chris Wilkes, Vice President, App Lab, Hearst Magazines, Chris Reynolds, Vice President, Marketing Analytics, Condé Nast, Chandra Magee, Senior Director, Digital Reader Outreach, The Economist, Kristine Shine, Chief Revenue Officer, PopSugar Media, and MS in Publishing Advisory Board member, and Bob Sacks, President, Precision Media Group.

Pace MS in Publishing student Ally Khristova says, “It was very rewarding to volunteer at Folio: MediaNext as I got to learn a lot about data, social media marketing, and digital newsstands. I also got to meet some great professionals in magazine publishing, including Caysey Welton, an associate editor of  Folio magazine, who was very welcoming and helpful.”

In the Keynote address for the conference, Elisabeth DeMarse, chair, president and CEO of TheStreet, Inc., a financial news and services network, addressed TheStreet Inc.’s turnaround: a company that has $60 million earmarked for acquisitions.

She also discussed her company’s subscription model and offered candid comments about downsizing her editorial staff and the expansion of TheStreet’s contributor content model. To read more about her talk, click here.

“Volunteering for the Folio: MediaNext conference was an eye-opening experience,” says Pace MS in Publishing student Caitlyn Callegari, “and I feel lucky to have had the opportunity to attend. While there, I was able to attend a Sales session and meet with the speakers, and I also had the opportunity to browse the exhibition and I think that this conference was a glimpse into the promising future of books and magazines.”

To get a sense of what the discussions were on Day One of the conference, click here to read the MediaNext: Day One Wrap-Up: Key strategic, quick-hit takeaways in mobile, revenue, social and more.

To read what the prolific and insightful Bob Sacks posted regarding the event, see his newsletter and website here.

If you are interested in connecting with other professionals in the magazine and emedia industry be sure to check out  the FOLIO: MediaPRO group on LinkedIn: the group for professionals in the magazine and eMedia publishing industry. If you are involved in the creation, sales, marketing, editorial, production and delivery of critical information, resources, community and content via print, the Web, live events & other mediums, this is your group!

Thank you again to Folio: mediaNEXT for providing us with this wonderful opportunity.  We all learned a great deal and are looking forward to next year’s conference!

The WNBA Presents the National Reading Group Month Author Panel

Bookmark your calendars on October 23 for the Women’s National Book Association National Reading Group Month Author Panel. The event will take place at The Strand Bookstore, Rare Book Room from 7-9 p.m. Members of the WNBA receive free admission and a $15 Strand gift card. Nonmembers can attend by purchasing a ticket for $15. Join the WNBA as student member for only $20. Join here!

SW♥♥N Reads

Are you interested in becoming a published author? Or interested in being a reader of manuscripts pre-publication?

Check out this unique opportunity:

SW♥♥N Reads is a revolutionary new crowd-sourced romance imprint dedicated to publishing books that capture the intensity and passion of teen love. Its also an opportunity for undiscovered writers and avid romance readers to come together to make books they love happen.

More than just another publishing imprint, SW♥♥N Reads will be a community, one whose members are included in every step of the publishing process, from the initial discovery of the manuscript, to providing edit notes, designing covers, and marketing the finished books.

Please visit the site today (swoonreads.com). This is an incredible opportunity to become a published author with a $15,000 advance and a standard royalty-based publishing contract!  Or to be a Reader on the site and play a role in what gets published.

Malala Day at the United Nations

The Pen is Mightier than the Sword

This is the compassion that I have learnt from Muhammad-the prophet of mercy, Jesus Christ and Lord Buddha. This is the legacy of change that I have inherited from Martin Luther King, Nelson Mandela and Muhammad Ali Jinnah. This is the philosophy of non-violence that I have learnt from Gandhi Jee, Bacha Khan and Mother Teresa. And this is the forgiveness that I have learnt from my mother and father. This is what my soul is telling me, be peaceful and love everyone.

— Malala Yousafzai

July 12, 2013 will go down in history as the first youth takeover of the United Nations. Over 500 young people between the ages of 13 and 24 from all over the globe were invited to the UN General Assembly to share, learn, and network on the global education crisis in an event called Malala Day, in honor of Malala Yousafzai. Over 56 million children in the world have never had access to education due to systemic cultural difficulties and a lack of resources. Even more children never make it passed primary school, and of those that do, many barely learn basic reading and math skills.  The numbers are so high and so widespread that we may not even know the true extent to which these problems reach.

As a UN Youth Representative for the WNBA and the daughter of a teacher, these problems are extremely close to my own heart. I have been lucky enough to have a supportive network with ample resources encouraging me to further my own education. Unfortunately the number of children who lack that same support is staggering.  Malala is one such case that deserves the world’s attention. In 2012, Malala was a bright young fifteen year old Pakistani girl with the world laid out in front of her. She believed in her right to education, and espoused those values on her personal blog. She identified the injustices against her gender, and shamed those who believe that women belong in the home rather than in the public sphere. One day on her way to school, male terrorists boarded her bus. They said, “Who is Malala?” and said that they would kill everyone aboard until they found her. These men shot Malala in the head along with two of her friends, because she dared to speak up on behalf of girls seeking an education. These men tried to silence her voice with force and violence.

They were not successful. Like a true-life superhero, Malala miraculously survived the attack and recovered after being moved to the United Kingdom. While some might have been silenced after such a despicable outbreak of violence, Malala has shown courage, bravery, and eloquence beyond her years. She came to the UN for this event- her first public appearance since the attack- and has strengthened her position on universal education for all. She credits her faith, parental support, and moral conviction for her recovery and bravery.

malala2

For the full video of Malala’s speech, click here.

There was hardly a dry eye in the room as Malala spoke in front of Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, her parents, and her peers. She inspired us all to take a stand for education both in our personal lives and in the global sphere for others. As we learned throughout the day at subsequent information fairs and panels, universal education has the potential to fix other problems such as poverty, health, and food shortages. With education those in developing countries could help fix the high mortality rates of pregnant females in their communities, learn sustainable agrarian techniques to feed the hungry, and practice leadership to address local problems within their societies. It all starts with education. It is Malala’s goal to have every child in school by 2015. She presented a petition with millions of signatures to the UN hoping to achieve that goal. Click here to sign Malala’s petition, sponsored by A World at School.

I couldn’t have been happier to meet with young people from around the world who shared my interests in global education. To hear their own stories about educational problems in their home countries was nothing short of heartbreaking. At the information fair I learned of campaigns from the Girl Scouts to help empower girls abroad, met with representatives from UNESCO to learn about their educational initiatives, and talked toWomen Thrive Worldwide about their awareness campaigns on women and education. Following the information fair we could choose different panels to attend. I participated in a grass-roots organizing workshop, in which we were given a topic and as a team worked together to develop a campaign around it, guided by the United Nations Girls Education Initiative. Following this workshop I participated in an online organizing event sponsored by A World at School and UNICEF. Different presenters, including Girl Rising and President Obama’s 2012 Social Media Director, talked about the importance of online communication and the best practices for building an audience for awareness campaigns.

Malala Day was one of the best days of my short professional career, as I got the chance to learn and grow with people from all over the world. I am so grateful for the opportunity to participate and will hold Malala’s virtues in my heart forever. Her courage and bravery in the face of systemic cultural violence is an inspiration to all.

By Jenna Vaccaro, Graduate Assistant at Pace University’s publishing program. Please find her on Linked In for more information.