The M.S. in Publishing Program Hosts Chinese Media Executives

By Kirsten D. Sandberg, Adjunct Professor

For two weeks, from September 25 to October 5, Pace University hosted a delegation of Chinese media executives from Jiangsu province. They came to meet their counterparts in New York and learn current best-practices in publishing (digital technology) and broadcasting. Continue reading “The M.S. in Publishing Program Hosts Chinese Media Executives”

Internships with the Big 5

*Please read this in conjunction with our Internship I & II post.

HACHETTE BOOK GROUP

Each year, Hachette Book Group (HBG) publishes more than 1,400 adult books, 300 YA/children’s books, and 450 audio books. HBG headquarters is located in New York City, but satellite offices can be found in Boston, Lebanon (IN), Nashville, Boulder, Philadelphia, and Berkeley. HBG also owns Hachette Book Group Canada, Inc., a marketing and publicity company located in Toronto. Familiar HBG imprints include: Little, Brown & CompanyHachette Books, and Perseus Books.

Fun facts:

  • HBG’s bestselling author list is stacked. James PattersonJ.K. Rowling, Stephen ColbertDavid SedarisTom Wolfe, Stephenie Meyer, and Malcolm Gladwell all write for Hachette imprints.
  • In 2016, 214 HBG books made the New York Times bestseller list (44 of these snagged the top spot at one point or another).
  • Grand Central Publishing, a division of Hachette Book Group, recently acquired Dear Evan Hansen: Through the Window, a behind-the-scenes look at the award-winning musical.

Jobs and PAID internship posts at HBG can be found here. Employment opportunities are broken down into 9 categories: art, distribution, editorial, finance, operations, production, publicity, sales, and subsidiary rights. Job descriptions are listed on the left hand side of the page, with corresponding location information on the right. You can also sign up for HBG job notification emails that alert you to new positions as they  become available.

Simon & Schuster

Richard L. (Dick) Simon and Max Lincoln Schuster were some of the first entrepreneurs to approach publishing from a marketing standpoint. From the very beginning, S&S spent five to ten times more money on advertising and promotion than their competitors, and it was the first publishing house to apply mass-market production and distribution techniques to books. In 1939, with the help of Robert Fair de Graff – a founder and former president of Pocket Books – the company brought about “the paperback revolution.” Today, Simon & Schuster, Inc. manages a number of divisions and imprints. In its adult publishing division, familiar imprint names include Gallery, Scribner, and Touchstone; in its children’s publishing division, familiar imprints include Aladdin, Little Simon, and Beach Lane Books. Today, S&S is part of the CBS Corporation with international companies in Australia, Canada, India, and the UK.

Fun facts:

  • Simon & Schuster publishes many recognizable entertainment brands like Pocket Books’ Star Trek® and MTV Books.
  • In 2016, Simon and Schuster’s Children’s Division introduced Salaam Reads, believed to be the first imprint focused on Muslim characters and stories.
  • Simon & Schuster is home to many recognizable stories for young readers like Peanuts, Olivia, and Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood.

Interns are placed “within specific imprints or divisions on either the adult or children’s side of the business based on interest, experience, academic coursework, and Simon & Schuster business needs. Past assignments have typically been within editorial, marketing, and publicity departments.” Each year, S&S has three 10-week internship programs in the summer, fall, and spring. The summer session is 35 hours/week, while fall and spring sessions are 16-20 hours/week (designed to accommodate academic schedules). Interns are PAID by the hour, and are required to fill out a weekly time sheet.

Applications for Simon & Schuster’s spring season open in December. For more internship information, click here.

HarperCollins

HarperCollins was founded in 1817 by brothers James and John Harper. Headquartered in New York City, the company has publishing operations in more than 18 countries and 120+ imprints around the world. Some of its more popular imprints include HarperCollins 360, HarperOne, HarperTeen, and HarperCollins Children’s Books. Between these imprints, HarperCollins publishes around 10,000 new books ever year in 17 languages. They have a print and digital catalog of more than 200,000 titles.

 

Fun facts:
  • HarperCollins has gone through a number of name changes in the past 200 years.
  • HarperCollins authors have won the Nobel Prize, the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, the Newbery and Caldecott Medals, and the Man Booker Prize.
  • Well-known authors include: Veronica Roth, Kiera Cass, Amy Zhang, Jodi Lynn Anderson, Robin Talley, and Lauren Oliver.

HarperCollins Spring internships open for applications in December. For more information, click here.

Macmillan Publishing was founded by Daniel and Alexander Macmillan in London in 1843. It has a number of imprints across the globe. Some of their U.S. publishers include Farrar, Straus and Giroux; Henry Holt and Company; Picador; St. Martin’s Press; Tor/Forge; Macmillan Audio; and Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group. Many of these publishers are based in New York City.

Fun facts:

  • Many of Macmillan’s publishers reside in the iconic Flatiron Building on 23rd Street and Broadway near Madison Square.
  • Macmillan has a number of podcasts available for public consumption like Steal the Stars, Feminasty, Rossen to the Rescue, Dig if you Will, and Rocket Talk.
  • Well-known authors include: Wendy Walker, Jeff Rossen, Elizabeth Bear, Sarah Gailey, and Thomas Moore.

For more information on job opportunities and internships, click here.


Penguin Random House

Penguin Random House was established on July 1, 2013 when Penguin Group and Random House merged. Today, the company is home to almost 250 publishing imprints. Its mission “is to foster a universal passion for reading by partnering with authors to help create stories and communicate ideas that inform, entertain, and inspire, and to connect them with readers everywhere.” Headquartered in New York City, Penguin Random House operates in 20 countries across five continents. It publishes about 70,000 digital and 15,000 print titles every year and has more than 100,000 eBooks available in its catalog.

Fun facts:

Penguin Random House offers internships in the fall, spring, and summer. For more on internships and how to apply, click here.

 

5th International Conference on Publishing Industry and Publishing Education in the Digital Era | Reflections from Wuhan, China by Professor Kathy Sandler

Professor Sandler and Yin “Ling” Mengling, a China Publishing Group employee who helped Sandler explore the city.

Kathy Sandler is the Senior Manager of Content Applications and Digital Workflow Development at Penguin Random House. She is also an Adjunct Faculty member in the M.S. in Publishing Program at Pace University. She specializes in management, workflow, and publishing technology for eBooks and iPad apps and enjoys developing classes for people in the industry. She recently published an article on “Innovation in Publishing: This is not an Oxymoron!” for Publishing Research Quarterly.

By: Professor Kathy Sandler

In October 2016, I traveled with Pace to China to lecture at the 5th International Conference on Publishing Industry and Publishing Education in the Digital Era sponsored by Wuhan University and Pace University. It was a fantastic experience! Here are a few of the memories I’d like to share.

Personally, I was struck by the warmth of the people I met. It was very exciting to meet dignitaries from Phoenix Publishing & Media Group and China Publishing Group, which are among the largest publishing companies in the world. But it was heartening to meet a number of former students who were so grateful to Professor Raskin and Professor Lian for what they learned at Pace.

The opening panel of the Wuhan Conference. (Professor Raskin is the fourth speaker from the right.)
I was lucky to have a tour guide in Beijing who worked at China Publishing Group named Yin “Ling” Mengling. I spoke with her at length about some of the great opportunities available in publishing associations in New York. We also discussed a book called Designing Your Life, which I recommend people use to think about their career and life goals.

After we parted, she paid for her own overnight train to Wuhan to attend the weekend conference and take Professor Lian, Professor Raskin and me around Wuhan University. She has since started a Literary Salon speaker series for her friends and colleagues, which she said I inspired her to do. Mark Fretz, who also attended the conference as part of the delegation from Pace, spoke at the inaugural session. I am very proud of Ling and happy I was able to touch her life.

Another thing that struck me in China that I hadn’t fully appreciated before was the giant contribution that Professor Raskin and Professor Lian have made to publishing education in China. Professor Lian was actually one of the founding members of the first publishing program in China at Wuhan University and was instrumental in starting the partnership between Pace and Wuhan U. Professor Raskin has made extremely strong relationships with the major publishing companies in China and, because of this, the companies have hand-picked executives to come train at Pace every year. (And they were able to start the Confucius Institute at Pace University, where I took Chinese classes before I went.) I have a newfound respect for the hard work they have done to build such strong ties.

Dinner in China with former Pace students. 
At the conference, my talk was on innovation. I spoke about projects in the publishing industry, including grass-roots efforts, where employees at any level can test their idea and pitch it to management. I was surprised that I was asked how an employee would be reprimanded if they had an idea that failed. I explained the value of a learning organization, where failing fast (and small) is a good thing. I was happy to see that they were thinking about how this idea could be implemented in their environment, and I hope in the future that organizations encourage their employees to submit ideas.

Professor Sandler speaking at the Wuhan Conference.
While Google, Facebook, Twitter, and other sites are blocked in China, the country is very technologically advanced. Most people use a platform called WeChat, which is a combination of the functionality of many programs in the U.S. like texting, FaceTime/Skype, Facebook, Twitter, and many others. (WeChat was created by TenCent, a phone company.) Many restaurants have you order and pay through your phone with Alipay, which is from the e-commerce company Alibaba, which has 423 million annual active buyers and about 80 per cent market share of e-commerce in China. There are QR codes everywhere on posters, bus shelters, ads, and menus, and they are very useful in connecting quickly through WeChat and other systems. I made many new contacts and friends in China and hope to stay in touch through WeChat.

I also visited many bustling bookstores in China. It was incredible to see the multi-story homage to the books owned by Phoenix Publishing & Media Group. I also visited a few branches of the Librarie Avant-Garde, including the famous one in a former bomb shelter/parking garage that has a beatnik vibe; a rustic one in a lush park, where you could sink into a comfy chair and feel like you were in a log cabin surrounded by books; and one on the Purple Mountain that sold only poetry books with lots of little rooms to explore. I felt right at home!

It was a fascinating trip, and I’m extremely grateful to have had the opportunity to go! It really opened my eyes to different perspectives and I learned a lot about international publishing, innovation, and myself.

 

Link of the Week: Full Fathom Five and Getting Past Genre

 

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Early last semester, Full Fathom Five (FFF) made an appearance on our blog as link of the week because of its new digital-only imprint. This week, in an article posted on Digital Book World engages the growing problem of digital acquisition and the increasingly disappointing results of genre-focused acquisition strategies. Samantha Streger, the Director of Digital Publishing at FFF, spoke about the issue that digital publishers are facing today:

fff-logo4Today, a paranormal romance ebook priced at $2.99 is just one of many thousands of paranormal romance ebooks priced at $2.99 or less. And that’s to say nothing of the huge number of ebooks that are available for free. Many publishers have found that the value of giving away free ebooks in order to build up reviews has all but disappeared.

What is the answer to the deflating profitability in ebooks? How should this problem be addressed?

Streger shared a list of five tactics that show promise when it comes to thinking creatively about acquiring and standing out with those acquisitions here, and challenged those in digital publishing to think differently. Even with something as “new” as ebooks, we’re seeing change in the landscape, and it’s important that these changes are engaged and that we can shift our positions and perspectives in ways that will best utilize what we’re presented with.