Summer 2012 Internship Report!

By Professor Jane Kinney-Denning

This summer, there were 20 students enrolled in PUB 699A, Internship I, and interning all over New York City (with one student in Florida) in prestigious internships in both the book and magazine publishing industries.  It has been a very exciting and rewarding summer for all, and certainly a wonderful way for Pace MS in Publishing students to build their resumes and launch their careers.  Below is a list showing where these students interned and what their titles were.  I have also included links to five of the final Internship Essays (one of the requirements of the course) in case any of you are interested in getting a better sense of what the internship experience was like for some of these students.  All of the essays my students submitted were excellent, but the ones attached represent a broad spectrum of experiences and showcase the varied interests and talents of our students.

I am very proud of all of these students and very grateful to the companies who hired them and provided them with such a wonderful educational opportunity.

Students in our program are required to complete one internship for credit (if they are not online students or already working in the industry or another industry) and to write a thesis paper in PUB 699B, Internship II, the following semester.  It is a wonderful way for them to reflect upon the experience and to develop expertise in a particular area of the industry—a useful thing for them to take with them as they begin interviewing for their first entry level positions.

These courses are offered in the Fall, Spring, and Summer, so if you are a student in the program and interested in doing an internship, please email me at jdenning@pace.edu to set up an appointment.  If you are an employer and have internship positions available and would like to interview some of our students, please email me at the above address anytime.

I believe that our internship program, coupled with courses that students take to complete the MS in Publishing degree, really prepare our students for successful publishing careers.  They enter the workplace with excellent skills, practical, real world experiences, outstanding technological skills, and a strong knowledge of current issues facing a dynamic and evolving publishing industry.

It is a pleasure working with our students and I am looking forward to another exciting academic year!

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James Abbate
Noelle Webster: Agency Intern – Charlotte Sheedy Literary Agency, http://sheedylit.com/
Liberty Schauf: Sales Intern – HarperCollins’ Distribution Client Services, http://www.harpercollins.com/
James Abbate: Editorial intern – Kensington Publishing, http://www.kensingtonbooks.com/
Read James’s Internship Essay here.
Rakesh Suresh: Production and Manufacturing Intern –
Hachette Book Group, http://www.hachettebookgroup.com/

Diana Cavallo
Zhen Li: Design Intern – Musee Magazine, http://museemagazine.com/
Coleman Bentley: Editorial Intern – Elite Traveler Magazine, http://www.elitetraveler.com/
Diana Cavallo: Agency Intern – Nancy Yost Literary Agency, http://www.nyliterary.com/
Read Diana’s Internship Essay here.
Shao-Chun Kung (Abby): Social Management Intern – classictravel.com, http://www.classictravel.com/

Andrew Villagomez
Mallory Davis: Styling Assistant – Cityist, http://www.cityist.com/
Andrew Villagomez: Editorial Intern – Passport Magazine, http://www.passportmagazine.com/
Read Andrew’s Internship Essay here.
Julia Cuozzo: Editorial Intern – bizbash media, http://www.bizbash.com/, and EMCblue.com, http://emcblue.com/
Yuhan Liu: Fashion/Editorial Intern – New York Monthly Magazine

Natanya Housman
Elyse Rozelle: Production Editorial Intern – Fodor’s Travel, a division of Random House, http://www.fodors.com/
Timothy Maxwell: Editorial Intern – classictravel.com, http://www.classictravel.com/
Natanya Housman: Social Media Intern – Workman Publishing, http://www.workman.com/
Agency Intern – Charlotte Sheedy Literary Agency, http://sheedylit.com/
Read Natanya’s Internship Essay here.
Nidale Hosri: Pub Marketing Intern – American Express Publishing, http://www.amexpub.com/

Hannah Bennett
Caroline Perny: Agency Intern – Folio Literary Management, http://foliolit.com/home-9/
Hannah Bennett: Editorial Intern – Tor Books, http://us.macmillan.com/TorForge.aspx
Read Hannah’s Internship Essay here.
Mary Caya: Operations Intern – Rain Publishing, LLC. (part of Fourth Door Creative Media), http://www.rainandgrow.com/
DJ McErlean-Hopson: Research Assistant for Dr. Sarah Blackwood (Pace University) and Professor Janet Neary (Hunter College) on their text, A More Perfect Likeness: African Americans Write Nineteenth-Century Visual Culture

Report from the Trenches: Spring Publishing Lectures

By Natanya Housman and Hannah Bennett

In recent weeks, the Pace University Publishing Program has presented two lectures for the benefit of publishing students, faculty, and staff.  The first, presented at the end of March, was the David Pecker Distinguished Visiting Professor Lecture, featuring Michael Healy.  The second, presented in April, was the Eliot DeYoung Schein Lecture, featuring Neil De Young.  Both speakers drew on their multifaceted publishing backgrounds to extend their opinions on this time of dramatic change.

Michael Healy presently serves as the Executive Director of the Copyright Clearance Center.  He assists in expanding market presence and refining business models to accommodate Backlist Rights.  Formerly, Mr. Healy served as the Executive Director of the Book Rights Registry.  For the last three years, Mr. Healy has been the David Pecker Distinguished Visiting Professor of Publishing.

Mr. Healy’s speech on March 29th, entitled Global, Mobile, and Personal: the Future of Publishing in Hazardous Times, was a broad discussion of the challenges and opportunities he sees in the future of the publishing industry.  In his analysis of the industry, Mr. Healy posed a series of questions, each of which highlighted a specific challenge for publishing professionals. What is the future value of publishers?  Does DRM help to reduce piracy?  If consumers only care about content and not brands, where does that leave the publishing industry?  These questions prompted audience members to evaluate their own potential roles in the industry, and the value publishers will have going forward.  Despite this inherent uncertainty, Mr. Healy’s final position was that now is a great time to enter the industry, and especially to start one’s own company.  He believes that the world has opened for new players, innovative and creative thinkers, and a new approach to publishing.

Neil De Young is the Director of Digital Media for Hachette Book Group, USA.  His responsibilities at Hachette include digital business development and strategy, eBook development, and website product management.  Mr. De Young reviews and assesses new business opportunities for Hachette, including contract negotiations and profit and loss assessment.  Prior to his position at Hachette, Mr. De Young held various positions at Scholastic, Inc.

Mr. De Young’s speech on April 11, entitled Disintermediation in the Digital Age: What Publishers Will Need to Do to Stay Relevant, discussed the digital transformation of the industry.  He did so through a series of parables.  In one parable, recounting the tale of a complacent pheasant and an opportunistic fox, Mr. De Young stressed the dangers of a lack of competition.  He later discussed the issue of competition in more detail when, speaking for himself and not Hachette, he answered an audience question regarding the agency model and the current litigation with the Department of Justice.  The government’s lawsuit poses questions about how to maintain healthy competition in the emerging ebook market – questions that professionals, like Neil De Young, must answer.  Other questions that must be answered are ebook pricing, DRM management, piracy, and disintermediation, which will require real innovation from Mr. De Young and his colleagues.  Based on his informative and thoughtful lecture, Mr. De Young is certainly up for the challenge.

These lectures, held every year, are unique opportunities for students to gain firsthand insight from brilliant publishing professionals.  They provide information that students cannot learn from the pages of a textbook.  Both inspiring and thought-provoking, these lectures encourage students to think creatively about the future of publishing and their places within the industry.