Group Reading with Jason Diamond, Chloe Caldwell, Morgan Jerkins, Danielle Henderson and Kat Kinsman

Thursday, January 26 at 7:00 pm

Word Bookstore
126 Franklin St
Brooklyn, NY 11222

Join in for a celebration of new books and fantastic memoir/essay/literary nonfiction writers!

Jason Diamond is the sports editor at Rollingstone.com and founder of Vol. 1 Brooklyn. His work has been published by The New York Times, BuzzFeed, Vulture, The New Republic, The Paris Review, Pitchfork, Esquire, Vice and many other outlets. He was born in Skokie, Illinois, but currently lives in Brooklyn with his wife, his two cats and his dog named Max.

Chloe Caldwell is the author of the essay collection I’ll Tell You in Person (Coffee House/Emily Books, 2016), the novella, WOMEN (Short Flight/Long Drive, 2014) and the essay collection Legs Get Led Astray (Future Tense Books, 2012).  She teaches creative nonfiction writing in New York City and online, and resides in Hudson.

Morgan Jerkins is a contributing editor at Catapult and a Book of the Month judge. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, Vogue, The New York Times, The Atlantic, ELLE, Rolling Stone, The Guardian, and BuzzFeed, among many others. She has contributed to Book Riot and Michigan Quarterly Review, and has been a Blog Editor for Side B Magazine. She is also an Assistant Agent at Fuse Literary. Her debut essay collection, This Will Be My Undoing, is forthcoming from Harper Perennial.

Danielle Henderson writes about film, television, and pop culture through the lens of race, gender, and class. She is a TV writer (HBO’s Divorce, Difficult People), freelance writer, and a former editor and staff writer for Rookie.  A book based on her popular website, Feminist Ryan Gosling, was released by Running Press in August 2012; you can still buy it, and you probably should. Her memoir, The Ugly Cry, will be published by Simon & Schuster in 2018.

Kat Kinsman is the senior food and drinks editor at Time Inc.’s Extra Crispy, former editor at large and editor in chief of Tasting Table, founding editor of CNN’s Eatocracy and former editor and writer for CNN Living. She’s a frequent public speaker and on-air commentator on the topics of food, drinks and mental health, and started the website chefswithissues.com to provide resources for restaurant workers in crisis. She lives in Brooklyn, NY, with her husband and various animals.

RSVP is encouraged but not required.  Seats and standing room are available on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Mid-Sentence: Writers in Conversation with Kris D’Agostino and Stefan Merrill Block

Friday, January 27, 6 pm

Mid-Manhattan Library
455 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY, 10016

Kris D’Agostino, author of The Antiques (Scribner, 2017), discusses his new novel with writer Stefan Merrill Block.

Mid-Sentence features writers in conversation on the state of literature today.

Admission is free on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Being a Dog: Following the Dog Into a World of Smell

Tuesday, January 31 at 6:30 pm

Mid-Manhattan Library
455 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY, 10016

This illustrated lecture explains how dogs perceive the world through their most spectacular organ—the nose—and how we humans can put our under-used sense of smell to work in surprising ways.

With Alexandra Horowitz, author of the bestselling “Inside of a Dog: What Dogs See, Smell, and Know” and “On Looking: A Walker’s Guide to the Art of Observation.”

Admission is free on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Brooklyn Book Launch: The Futures by Anna Pitoniak

Wednesday Feb 01 at 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

POWERHOUSE 
28 Adams St.
Brooklyn , NY 11201

In this dazzling debut novel about love and betrayal, a young couple moves to New York City in search of success–only to learn that the lives they dream of may come with dangerous strings attached.

Admission is free. RSVP appreciated: RSVP@powerHouseArena.com

 

Interview with Susan Katz, the David Pecker Distinguished Visiting Professor

Interview with Susan Katz, David Pecker Distinguished Visiting Professor
for the 2015-2016 Academic Year

734SusanKatz_0

It is an honor to have Susan Katz serving as the David Pecker Distinguished Professor for the 2015-2016 academic year. Ms. Katz joined Harper & Row in 1987 as President and Publisher of the College Division and as a member of the Executive Committee. In 1996, Katz made the transition from educational to trade publishing and became President of the HarperCollins Children’s Division, which is the position she held for 19 years until her retirement this past September.

During her tenure, Katz tripled the revenues of the division and had published more NEW YORK TIMES children’s bestsellers than any other publisher. She had the honor of working with such authors and illustrators such as Eric Carle, Kiera Cass, Neil Gaiman, Robin Preiss Glasser, Daniel Handler, Kevin Henkes, Kadir Nelson, Jane O’Connor, Lauren Oliver, Veronica Roth, Maurice Sendak, Sara Shepard, and Shel Silverstein.

Katz was a member of the Advisory Board of First Book and a member of the Children’s Book Council. She holds a bachelor’s degree in education from Boston University and a master’s degree from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Jane O’Connor and one of her books Nancy Clancy, Super Sleuth

Her first lecture will take place on Thursday, October 29th, 2015 at Pace University, 163 Williams St, 18th floor, from 6-8pm, where she will be discussing her experiences in Children’s Books Publishing as well as what goes into the making of a bestselling book with two of her colleagues, Jane OConnor, the author of the Fancy Nancy picture book series, as well as her editor, Margaret Anastas, Professor Jane Denning had the pleasure of interviewing Ms. Katz as she assumes her new role at Pace. The pair discussed what she hopes to accomplish as the David Pecker Distinguished Professor as well as some advice she has to offer to current Pace M.S. in Publishing students.

Prof. Denning: Hi Susan and thank you for agreeing to do this interview! Congratulations on being named the Visiting David Pecker Distinguished Professor for the 2015-2016 academic year. Can you tell us a bit about what you hope to accomplish this year at Pace?

Susan Katz: Thank you. I am very excited to have the opportunity to share some of my experiences with students here at Pace. I have always enjoyed hearing an “insider’s view’ of any profession that interests me because it becomes less mysterious and yet more interesting the more I learn. I hope students will find the information as well as my stories and anecdotes useful and entertaining in equal measure. 

Prof. Denning: As the Visiting Professor, you will be giving two lectures throughout the course of the year. What do you want students to take away from these lectures? Any pearls of wisdom you can impart for us now?

Susan Katz: I have asked colleagues to join me during both lectures. I am sharing case studies which I think will be exciting to hear because in both cases the books turned into major bestsellers. I want students to get a feel for “what it takes” to make a book into a major success. I’ve asked two of my colleagues to join me because they were key contributors to creating the successes.

Prof. Denning: Many of our students here at Pace have varied interests within the world of publishing. When you were first starting out in the industry, did you know that you wanted to end up working with Childrens books?

Susan Katz: Many folks call publishing the “accidental profession.” I didn’t start out with an interest in publishing, which I will be happy to explain at the first lecture. I did start out with a passion for reading, and a love of children’s books. I never thought I would be lucky enough to have the opportunity to work in the world of children’s books, which came midway through my career.

Prof. Denning: If a student is interested in the childrens book industry (or any other aspect of publishing) what is the best way for them to break in?

Susan Katz: Start with an internship or an entry level position. Make sure you use all of the resources at Pace to make your first connections. Attend Industry events. Talk to bookstore staff. Build relationships. More advice to come.

Prof. Denning: As our students gear up to enter the workforce, what sort of skills should they develop while in the MS in Publishing program so they can embark upon a successful career in publishing, whether in editorial, marketing, sales, or production or any other aspect of the business?

Susan Katz: It’s important to learn as much about the field as possible. So much information is available on line! Read the relevant business publications and research the publishers by visiting their websites. Bone up on the industry by reading newspaper articles in the area of publishing that interests you. Be sure to study the challenges the industry is facing so that you are prepared to focus on the thriving areas.

Prof. Denning: Can you tell us a bit about our lecture that will take place on Thursday, Oct. 29th ?

Susan Katz: As I metioned earlier, Jane O’Connor, the author of the Fancy Nancy picture book series, as well as her editor, Margaret Anastas, will be joining me. I thought it would be interesting to break the session into two parts. First, I’d like each of us to talk a bit about our careers, our experiences and how we got to the place we are today, and then I thought we would explain the picture book market and each describe our specific experiences in creating this fantastic picture book franchise that has sold over 30 million copies and is still selling today.

Prof. Denning: Thank you Susan!  We are really looking forward to your lecture.

Guest Lecture on Internship Success

Writer's House
Michael Mejias of Writers House Literary Agency (http://www.writershouse.com/) will be a guest lecturer in PUB 610 on Thursday, October 22 from 7-8 at the Pace Midtown campus, room 823. His talk will include his thoughts on how to secure and shine at an internship and how to land a job at a Big 5 publisher. Michael runs one of the most successful internship programs in publishing and you can sign up for his newsletter at http://bit.ly/PublishingSuccess. Space is limited.
If you’d like to attend, please email Michelle Richter at mrichter@pace.edu.

 

Spring 2013 David Pecker Lecture by Arthur A. Levine

Inspiration from Arthur A. Levine

By Professor Manuela Soares

 

Children’s Book editor and publisher Arthur Levine shared insights about his life and career at the 2nd David Pecker Lecture on April 10th at the Midtown Executive Club.

 

With charm, enthusiasm, and wit Arthur revealed his professional journey  — from looking for his first job in publishing to being offered his own imprint at Scholastic years later.

 

Arthur wanted this lecture to be less formal and so he chose to talk about his successes and failures. It seemed like a strange topic, he said, but it was important to look closely at the decisions that led to those successes and failures.  It was important to be able to say,  “Yes, I made mistakes and I’m still here.  You’ll all make mistakes …. Some big, some small – and you’ll be OK, too.” 

 

Being committed to what he wanted to do was very important, especially in those early years. Having graduated from college and taken a publishing course, Arthur was told that he would never find a job in children’s publishing. Despite that, he persevered, which led to this advice to students: “Hold out for the job making books you really care about.”

 

Arthur offered many inspiring life lessons, from those early days of job hunting to learning from some of the legendary editors in children’s book publishing. Having been mentored in his own career and having sought out mentorship  – he has always hired and mentored young talent. 

 

In talking about mentoring, Arthur stressed that students must be active in their own careers – making connections to people, finding a mentor.  Taking chances helped him in his own career.  Too much caution, he said, is short-sighted.  And he gave examples of books that he didn’t pursue, didn’t fight hard enough for – that went on to become very successful.  Overcoming opposition to your decisions is important, he said. But also knowing when to fight was important, too.

Editors have the power to say no to a project, but acquiring it involves getting support from your colleagues in marketing and sales. There is no such thing as real power, only influence. Deciding when and how to use it were key elements.

 

Arthur made a point of saying that in today’s world, editorial must listen to the business side, but not at the expense of editorial clarity and vision. It’s not business versus editorial, but business and editorial together.

 

Harry Potter was an important acquisition in Arthur’s career, but it’s important to  remember that his career is full of  a great many award-winning and notable acquisitions and projects: Philip Pullman’s The Golden Compass, Rafe Martin and David Shannon’s The Rough-Face Girl, Jerry Spinelli’s Crash, Barbara Bottner’s Bootsie Barker Bites, Gary Soto’s Chato’s Kitchen, Tomie dePaola’s Tomie dePaola’s Book of Poems, and two Caldecott winners, Peggy Rathmann’s Officer Buckle and Gloria, and Emily McCully’s Mirette on the High Wire, along with many other awards and honors.  Arthur is also a writer himself  —  the author of seven picture books: All the Lights in the Night, Bono and Nonno, The Boardwalk Princess, Monday Is One Day, Pearl Moscowitz’s Last Stand, Sheep Dreams and The Boy Who Drew Cats.

 

Arthur revealed his passion for his work, but made a point of the importance of leading a life rich with family, friends and other interests – being captain of his tennis team, belonging to a synagogue. This richness in his life has a positive effect on his work and keeps him from getting burned out or too self-reverential.

 

Arthur’s talk was funny, informative, insightful, and at times, poignant, but I have to admit, I missed him singing, as he did in the first lecture.

 

It was a wonderful talk from a talented, generous, and insightful industry professional. Our gain is Refrigeration Weekly’s loss.

 

Mr. David Pecker developed the David Pecker Distinguished Visiting Professor Lectures to foster publishing education and the Pace University MS in Publishing program.

Report From the Trenches: Book Industry Study Group Annual Meeting

On Friday, September 27th a number of Pace University MS in Publishing students and professors were invited to attend the Annual Members Meeting of the Book Industry Study Group.  It was a wonderful opportunity to hear from Len Vlahos, the Executive Director of the Book Industry Study Group, and Angela Bole, the Deputy Executive Director of the Book Industry Study Group, who spoke about the strategic value of BISG within the global book marketplace.   It was a very interesting session and we were all grateful to have the opportunity to attend and network with such a prestigious group of industry professionals.

 

For further coverage of and information about the program, see the following links from Shelf Awareness, Publishers Weekly, and The Shatzkin Files:

             Published in Shelf Awareness

              Published in Publishers Weekly

             Published in The Shatzkin Files

 

Below, Heather Allen, a first semester student in the MS in Publishing program, shares some of the things she learned at the meeting.

 

Things I Learned from the BISG Annual Member Meeting:

According to their website, The Book Industry Study Group (BISG) “is a national, not-for-profit U.S. book trade association with the mission of creating a more informed, empowered and efficient book industry. [They are] committed to the development of effective industry-wide standards, best practices, research and events related to both physical and digital products that enhance relationships between all trading partners.”

 Since this was my first time being exposed to this kind of atmosphere (The Annual Meeting of Industry Professionals, Yale Club, ballroom, catered coffee break and lunch, plus lot of great industry information), I learned quite a few things.

  1. Publishing is sexy

Who would have thought?  By having a passion for publishing and an interest in making the publishing world go ‘round’ is what the members of BISG do day-in and day-out.  They find statistics sexy because it reflects the hard work the BISG does.  The committees within BISG include rights, publication, manufacturing & distribution, metadata, and the ISBN- 13 task force, which help decide standards and practices that have been set forth for the past 36 years.

 

        2. Metadata is important

Luckily for me, I had the chance to sit at a table with a metadata expert from Bowker,  a company that provides data to publishers/ retailers/ libraries to help them better reach the consumer.  Metadata is the information customers haveabout each book: the title, the description, ISBN etc., which is put out by the publishers basically, metadata is information about information.  How this relates to publishing is this: publishers need metadata to track the customer’s interests.  By doing this publishers are also able to track book statistics and the health of the industry

 

      3. Change is coming…

As the Starks of Winterfell would say…  Essentially be prepared to go in directions you might not expect to go.  In the panel discussion, the former chair of BISG Dominique Raccah stated that when she first took over the position six years ago, she did not expect the industry to end up where it did.  From the topics covered, it seems that publishers should be prepared to expect a changes in the industry with regarding ebooks.  Ken Michaels, COO and President of Hachette believes however, that  we should not rely solely on technology as we move forward.  During the panel discussion Maureen McMahon, President and Publisher of Kaplan Publishing also spoke about the skill sets she looks for when hiring new people – most importantly is the ability to learn and teach and being able to self-teach,  to help combat and adapt to the expected/unexpected changes.

-Heather Allen