Condé Nast Makes the Move to 1 World Trade Center

In an insightful article for the New York Times, Charles V. Bagli describes Condé Nast’s recent move to Lower Manhattan:

1 World Trade Center“For two days last weekend, moving trucks shuttled a total of 2,800 orange crates crammed with files, photographs and books from a Times Square office tower downtown to the tallest skyscraper in North America, 1 World Trade Center.

“It was the first wave in the migration of what will be 3,400 editors, writers and advertising executives at 18 magazines from Condé Nast moving to the World Trade Center, confirming both the long-awaited reconstruction of the complex and a shift in the culture downtown.”

He goes on to chronicle the powerhouse magazine publisher’s re-location from Madison Avenue to Midtown in 1999, which then inspired the revitalization of Times Square.  The move to the World Trade Center keeps with Condé Nast’s history of staying on the cutting edge, as we see technology, advertising, and media companies replacing large financial institutions.  Condé Nast’s presence will undoubtedly breathe new life into the downtown culture, and we should expect to see luxury retailers, art galleries, and restaurants continue to pop up.

Vanity Fair CoverWhile the magazine publisher’ s Midtown locale was known for its unique cafeteria designed by Frank O. Gehrey, the same aesthetic will not be replicated at 1 World Trade.  However, prominent editor Graydon Carter, who has been the chief overseer of Vanity Fair for the past 22 years, was given a generous budget and the opportunity to hire an interior designer for his swanky corner office.

Mr. Carter recently appeared  on “CBS This Morning” to promote the release of Bohemians, Bootleggers, Flappers and Swells, a book that was published in honor of Vanity Fair‘s 100th anniversary.  See the full interview below:

 

To read the full New York Times article, click here.

To purchase the book, published in hardcover October 30, 2014, click here.

Quote of the Week

 “A magazine is a great invention. You take the best things you can find from around the world, you put together great stories, great photography and you give it to the consumer for $5. They can pass it on to somebody else; they can recycle it. If they lose it they can buy another one. It’s available everywhere, and we’ll send it to their door for less. That’s a pretty good deal. Magazines are a very viable part of our lives and will be for as long as people are alive.”

Graydon Carter, editor of Vanity Fair magazine