Faculty News: David Delano

David Delano, Adjunct Professor
Pace University, M.S. in Publishing

David Delano’s entire career has been about books. He started working in book publishing in 1970 after attending Northwestern University and Loyola University, where he received a BA in English. His experience ranges from design to editorial management, from title acquisition to manufacturing, from production assistant to VP, and all the stops in-between.  Professor Delano’s publishing background includes Random House and Harper & Row, and printing experience was earned with industry leaders like R.R. Donnelley, G.W. Banta, and W.A. Krueger.  Currently, he is the US representative for a global printing company, Toppan Printing, Hong Kong.  Professor Delano has taught at Pace since the early 2000’s.  He also lectures at the Columbia Publishing Seminar and the NYU Summer Publishing Program.  Professor Delano has also judged the New York Book Show three times.

To add to his resume, during the summer break, Professor Delano had the pleasure of writing a book review for Publishing Research Quarterly, which has led to more writing opportunities. His review was on the book Paper: Paging through History by Mark Kurlansky, an American journalist and nonfiction writer. Paper: Paging through History is about paper production and how society  going “paperless” actually tells us that paper is here to stay.

According to Professor Delano, Kurlansky “utilized his remarkable forensic research skills to bring to life the development of a simple commodity: paper,” while capturing “the influence of paper on the global development of language, literacy, media, art, commerce and learning.” He also concludes that Paper: Paging through History “is not structured as a typical history book, but more like a biography, written with many arcs and sub-plots woven together with the development of virtually every major element that defines the human experience. Paper has been there through it all, preserving man’s permanent record.”

End of 2015 Roundup

Pace logo 2The Spring 2015 semester has been a very busy one for the MS in Publishing program.

The first event was a Student Appreciation Dinner held on Wednesday, April 8, 2015 at 163 Williams St.  The event’s purpose was reflective of its name: an evening dedicated to celebrating the success and hard work of the MS in Publishing students.  It was an evening of celebration and good food and conversation.

In attendance were many Pace University officials including Uday Sukhatme, Provost and Executive VP of Academic Affairs, Nira Herrmann, the Dean of Dyson College, Eugenia Hayes, the Director of Development for Dyson College, Maria Iacullo-Bird, the Assistant Dean of Grad Programs, Susan Ford, the University Director of Graduate Admissions, and Professor Sherman Raskin, the Chair of the MS in Publishing program. Faculty members Manuela Soares, Jodylynn Bachiman, Xiao-Chaun Lian, Andrea Baron, and  Paul Levitz were also in attendance alongside some new faculty including Rich Johnson and Kevin CallahanClick here to view MS in Publishing Faculty bios!

Both David Delano and Kathy Sandler spoke about their experiences teaching in the program and their dedicated work in the publishing industry. To the students and young professionals in attendance who are getting ready to make their debuts, they offered words of advice and encouragement. Harry Wang and Ram Katri, recipients of the 2015 Edgell and Littleford scholarships, spoke about the opportunities that the Publishing program has provided for them, and Melanie Mitzman, Imprint Marketing Manager at Gallery/Pocket Books, shared with attendees her role in the industry and how her education in the program prepared her for that role.

Student Appreciation Dinner
Students at the dinner.

Current students and alumni of the program also made up most of the audience, which included over 70 people.  We are very fortunate to have such a dynamic and successful group of alumni (see our alumni interviews here), who frequently contribute to the Publishing program by attending events, teaching in the program, mentoring students and assisting them in their job and internship searches.  This event provided students with a wonderful opportunity to network and to learn more about opportunities for employment within the publishing industry.

On Wednesday, April 29, 2015, students, faculty, and friends of the MS in Publishing program were invited to the Spring 2015 David Pecker Lecture. It was an honor to have Professor Paul Levitz serve as the David Pecker Distinguished Professor for the 2014-2015 academic year. Formerly president and publisher of DC Comics and presently teaching Publishing Comics and Graphic Novels and Publishing Transmedia at Pace University, Professor Levitz is a comic fan, editor, writer, and executive. He is currently working on a book on Will Eisner and the birth of the graphic novel for Abrams Comic Arts.
Professor Levitz has been in the comic book business as a writer and editor for more than 35 years, and has been in part responsible for the discovery of writers like Marv Wolfman and Alan Moore, and artists like George PérezKeith Giffen, and John Byrne.

Titlecomp
Titles by Paul Levitz

Professor Levitz presented a lecture titled, The Era of Visual Information. Professor Raskin, the Chair of the MS in Publishing program, gave Professor Levitz a warm welcome and thanked him for his support of the program.

“We expect everything to be visual now,” said Levitz, detailing the rise of a visually driven society. “We are living in the era of visual information and visual communication, and as publishers we need to acknowledge that. More, we need to be prepared to accomplish that. Further, we need to advocate that.” Professor Levitz reminded attendees that the growing interest in visual content is not going to go away any time soon, and as such, publishers need to consider how to approach their field in a way that draws newer generations to storytelling.

Sherman Raskin (L) and Paul Levitz (R)
Sherman Raskin (L) and Paul Levitz (R)

The tools that allow laymen to create content are readily available, and as they continue to develop, more opportunities become available to a wider range of people. New avenues for curating and publishing content are emerging, and Professor Levitz presented a challenge to those in the industry: “We are obliged, as publishers, to find the best ways to connect our creators with the community that is interested in their work. We are obliged, as publishers, to be effective in presenting their work with the widest variety of forms and tools possible.”

The words of Professor Levitz are an urgent reminder to both those just starting in publishing and those who are already an active part to embrace the challenges that the changing publishing and media landscape are presenting. It is our responsibility to engage and present the work of authors and artists in a way that is most meaningful to our audiences and culture.

Faculty in the Spotlight – September 2012

Professor Kerstin Vogdes Diehn is an Adjunct Professor in the Pace Publishing Department.  She teaches Desktop Publishing for the Publishing Professional at both beginner and advanced levels.  The following piece by Professor Diehn describes her history in publishing, as well as her current work in the field.

I started out like a lot of students in the publishing program. My job was as an editorial assistant for a publishing company, University Press of America. Forced to read “Chicago manual of style” cover-to-cover, I soon grew bored of finding editorial idiosyncrasies, and found myself more interested in the cover mechanicals I was asked to proof. I would look at them and think, “This is awful. I could do a better job.” At that time, I had no desktop publishing skills, no typographic training, and no real design experience, just a bunch of painting and drawing courses under my belt.

So I decided to learn. I enrolled in night classes to learn desktop publishing software (at that time, Yikes, it was the now defunct Adobe Pagemaker and much maligned Quark Xpress). After honing those skills, I started working as a desktop publisher (a job that no longer exists!) in a variety of places. Once I felt like I’d reached a certain point, I went back to school (Pratt Institute) to get a M.S. in Communication Design. It was there I learned about the finer points of composition and typography, but I always had to keep myself technologically savvy as the software was constantly evolving and computers were getting faster and faster.

After grad school I worked as a designer for Blumlein Associates, Inc., a full service design studio on Long Island. But in 2001, I decided to break out on my own and freelance. I wanted more diverse projects, more diverse clients and more opportunity to learn new skills along the way.

I now do a wide range of design projects – from printed collateral to web design to logo development and branding. I really enjoy editorial work (magazine design) and currently have a regular gig art directing a few magazines for a small publisher, Sokol Media. I also design book interiors and book covers, but with the state of publishing being what it is these days, those projects are more infrequent. I’ve had to evolve with the industry and learn ebook conversion as well – recently I converted 3 books I laid out in print into Kindle ebooks (a challenge for any designer since you can’t control the font styling, sizing, and sidebars).  While I do have my hand in the publishing industry, many of my clients are nonprofit organizations with communication needs such as UNICEF, United Methodist Women, the American Lung Association, Riverside Park Fund, and NYC Parks.

I started teaching Desktop 1 and 2 at Pace about 5 years ago and my courses have undergone major changes during this time. When I started, we were laying out all of our initial designs in Quark! Fortunately, the Adobe suite has made it easier to integrate design and layout skills into a much more streamlined package. Indesign is changing with every version to adapt to ebook and emagazine design and it’s my job as a professor to make sure that I stay current with the software and know what enhancements are in each version. In my Desktop 1 course, we always focus on the core of the Adobe Creative Suite, learning a little Illustrator, a little Photoshop and a little Indesign. Students learn the programs by doing projects that relate to the book industry (e.g., laying out a few chapters of a book in Indesign, designing a book cover mechanical in Photoshop, and now, converting a document for EPUB format).  I try to have a cover designer come in and show his or her portfolio and explain how cover design works in house at a big publisher.

In Desktop 2, we delve deeper into the programs and learn more sophisticated technology skills.  This course focuses on the magazine side of the industry. First we hone our Photoshop skills by doing a large surrealist collage. Then, we develop a mock up magazine from cover to cover (ok, it’s only 8 pages…). Students must create the content, come up with the concept, find and edit the assets, and do all of the editorial design. Last semester, for the first time, we converted our designs into emagazines using Adobe’s new Digital Publishing Tools, which uses the “cloud” to save and organize files. As those tools continue to evolve, so will this portion of the course!

I’m continuously surprised that Desktop 1 is not a requirement course as basic knowledge of the Adobe Suite is critical these days in publishing! Some students may end up working on the production side (whether that is electronic or print), and using the Creative Suite will be part of the daily routine. However, it’s important in other areas as well as there will always be a need to make minor corrections to existing documents, and understanding how it all works allows people in any position to work more effectively with production and art departments. It’s good to take a little of the magic and mysticism out of the process!

As time and technology march on, I also think it’s important for students to keep up-to-date with some basic web development as well. Knowing the basics of HTML is important to understanding how an ebook is constructed and as many publishing elements move online, it becomes more and more critical to draw parallels and distinctions between web and print design.

I highly recommend students subscribe to several magazines to stay current on the industry. Personally I devour Wired, Print, How, and Communication Arts to keep up with design and technology. I also recommend students check out Design Observer (designobserver.com), a really great blog about design and culture. I also collect a lot of books that compile great designs (Rockport Publishers offers different books highlighting all kinds of materials). If students are looking for a good read from a funny and clever designer, I highly recommend 79 Short Essays on Design, and when being a designer seems too close to being a corporate zombie, I recommend reading How to be a Graphic Designer without Losing Your Soul, a wonderful collection of essays by some of the most famous designers today. Finally, I would recommend everyone own a copy of the famous Philip Meggs book, History of Graphic Design, which details the origins of the written letterform and moves all the way up to groundbreaking work in the technology age.

If you want to see samples of my work, check out my site at http://www.kvdesign.net.

Aaron Goldsmid

Aaron Goldsmid

Professor Aaron Goldsmid currently serves as a Digital Product Manager at Facebook, Inc.  He has also worked for Audible, Inc., an Amazon.com company, as the Director of Discovery Products, and for Everyday Health, Inc., as the Executive Director of Product Development.  Professor Goldsmid will be teaching PUB 622J “Seminar on Books & Magazines: Practical Applications of Product Management in Digital Media” this summer with Professor Christine Ford.