Jobs of the Week

Grand Central Publishing: Publicity Assistant

Location: New York, NY
Position: Full-time
Experience: Entry-level

Grand Central Publishing (formerly Warner Books) is an imprint at Hachette Book Group, one of the Big 5 publishers. It has published books by many authors, including: James Patterson (Women’s Murder Club), David Baldacci (End Game), and Min Jin Lee (Pachinko). Continue reading “Jobs of the Week”

Quote of the Week | John Irving


Quotes on Education are a dime a dozen on the Internet (please excuse the cliched use of this idiom). Some are real gems, and some are too earnest to post this early-on in the year. Since we’re all embarking on our first full week of the semester, however, education seemed an apropos theme for blog one of the 2017/18 academic year. After all, as screenwriter Gene Perret once said, “Education can get you the only thing that really matters in today’s world – an assigned parking space,” and that’s why we’re all really here – to get a parking space in front of the publishing house that inspired us to apply to this program.

But Perret is not the author we’d like to feature in today’s post. Instead, let’s pivot to the best-selling novelist (and former wrestler) whose writing style has been compared to Charles Dickens by The Boston Globe.


“With every book, you go back to school. You become a student. You become
an investigative reporter. You spend a little time learning what it’s like to live in someone else’s shoes.” — John Irving

Born in Exeter, New Hampshire in 1942, John Irving wrote his first novel, Setting Free the Bears, in 1968 when he was just 26 years old. Throughout his illustrious career, Irving has had 17 books published – 14 novels, two memoirs, and one collection of short stories, although he is best known, perhaps, for his novel The Cider House Rules, which won him an Oscar in 2000 for Best Adapted Screenplay. Irving is no stranger to awards, however. His 1978 novel The World According to Garp earned the National Book award in 1980 and In One Person, his 2014 novel about a bisexual man falling in love with a transgender woman, won the Lambda Literary Award in 2013. His most recent novel, Avenue of Mysteries, was published by Simon & Schuster in 2015.

For more on John Irving’s writing process, check out his Big Think interview on “The Thrill of the Black Page.”

Malala Day at the United Nations

The Pen is Mightier than the Sword

This is the compassion that I have learnt from Muhammad-the prophet of mercy, Jesus Christ and Lord Buddha. This is the legacy of change that I have inherited from Martin Luther King, Nelson Mandela and Muhammad Ali Jinnah. This is the philosophy of non-violence that I have learnt from Gandhi Jee, Bacha Khan and Mother Teresa. And this is the forgiveness that I have learnt from my mother and father. This is what my soul is telling me, be peaceful and love everyone.

— Malala Yousafzai

July 12, 2013 will go down in history as the first youth takeover of the United Nations. Over 500 young people between the ages of 13 and 24 from all over the globe were invited to the UN General Assembly to share, learn, and network on the global education crisis in an event called Malala Day, in honor of Malala Yousafzai. Over 56 million children in the world have never had access to education due to systemic cultural difficulties and a lack of resources. Even more children never make it passed primary school, and of those that do, many barely learn basic reading and math skills.  The numbers are so high and so widespread that we may not even know the true extent to which these problems reach.

As a UN Youth Representative for the WNBA and the daughter of a teacher, these problems are extremely close to my own heart. I have been lucky enough to have a supportive network with ample resources encouraging me to further my own education. Unfortunately the number of children who lack that same support is staggering.  Malala is one such case that deserves the world’s attention. In 2012, Malala was a bright young fifteen year old Pakistani girl with the world laid out in front of her. She believed in her right to education, and espoused those values on her personal blog. She identified the injustices against her gender, and shamed those who believe that women belong in the home rather than in the public sphere. One day on her way to school, male terrorists boarded her bus. They said, “Who is Malala?” and said that they would kill everyone aboard until they found her. These men shot Malala in the head along with two of her friends, because she dared to speak up on behalf of girls seeking an education. These men tried to silence her voice with force and violence.

They were not successful. Like a true-life superhero, Malala miraculously survived the attack and recovered after being moved to the United Kingdom. While some might have been silenced after such a despicable outbreak of violence, Malala has shown courage, bravery, and eloquence beyond her years. She came to the UN for this event- her first public appearance since the attack- and has strengthened her position on universal education for all. She credits her faith, parental support, and moral conviction for her recovery and bravery.

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For the full video of Malala’s speech, click here.

There was hardly a dry eye in the room as Malala spoke in front of Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, her parents, and her peers. She inspired us all to take a stand for education both in our personal lives and in the global sphere for others. As we learned throughout the day at subsequent information fairs and panels, universal education has the potential to fix other problems such as poverty, health, and food shortages. With education those in developing countries could help fix the high mortality rates of pregnant females in their communities, learn sustainable agrarian techniques to feed the hungry, and practice leadership to address local problems within their societies. It all starts with education. It is Malala’s goal to have every child in school by 2015. She presented a petition with millions of signatures to the UN hoping to achieve that goal. Click here to sign Malala’s petition, sponsored by A World at School.

I couldn’t have been happier to meet with young people from around the world who shared my interests in global education. To hear their own stories about educational problems in their home countries was nothing short of heartbreaking. At the information fair I learned of campaigns from the Girl Scouts to help empower girls abroad, met with representatives from UNESCO to learn about their educational initiatives, and talked toWomen Thrive Worldwide about their awareness campaigns on women and education. Following the information fair we could choose different panels to attend. I participated in a grass-roots organizing workshop, in which we were given a topic and as a team worked together to develop a campaign around it, guided by the United Nations Girls Education Initiative. Following this workshop I participated in an online organizing event sponsored by A World at School and UNICEF. Different presenters, including Girl Rising and President Obama’s 2012 Social Media Director, talked about the importance of online communication and the best practices for building an audience for awareness campaigns.

Malala Day was one of the best days of my short professional career, as I got the chance to learn and grow with people from all over the world. I am so grateful for the opportunity to participate and will hold Malala’s virtues in my heart forever. Her courage and bravery in the face of systemic cultural violence is an inspiration to all.

By Jenna Vaccaro, Graduate Assistant at Pace University’s publishing program. Please find her on Linked In for more information.

Summer Internship Opportunities at Scholastic!

Scholastic is the world’s largest publisher and distributor of children’s books. With more than 90 years in children’s publishing, Scholastic’s philosophy remains: every child deserves the opportunity to learn to read and develop a love of reading for a lifetime. They believe that literacy – the ability to read, write, and understand – is the birthright of every child in the world, as well as the pathway to succeed in school and realize a complete life.

Scholastic’s Summer Internship Program provides an opportunity to gain experience in a variety of Scholastic businesses. The application deadline is swiftly approaching! It is Friday, March 30, 2012. The program will run for 8 weeks beginning Monday, June 18 through Friday, August 10, 2012, and interns are paid $12.00 per hour and work a 35-hour week.

Requirements:

  • All students must be in good academic standing and have strong computer skills, as well as excellent written and verbal communication skills
  • Be able to work 35 hours per week

Selection of Interns:

  • Interns are selected on the basis of their academic standing, participation in extracurricular activities, and previous work and/or internship experience
  • Interns may be interviewed by telephone or at a Scholastic office. References may be requested

How To Apply:

To apply for this position, students must do two things: First, please e-mail Professor Denning, at jkinneydenning@pace.edu, a copy of your resume and cover letter so that she can pass it along directly to Scholastic’s HR Manager.

In addition, students must apply through the Scholastic website. Scholastic is currently accepting online applications for the summer program through Friday, March, 30, 2012. Apply to the internship program by clicking on the business area you’re interested in from the list below. With your application, you will need to provide:

  • cover letter that should including the following:
    – Your School’s Name
    – Your Major/Degree
    – Your Graduation Date
    – An explanation of how your participation in Scholastic’s Summer Internship Program fits with your academic and/or career goals
  • Your current resume (Word or PDF)

Each link below takes you to the appropriate requisition in the Scholastic Career Center. Once there, please create your profile, and include your cover letter and attachments.