Link of the Week: Internship Resource Page

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This week I want to take the chance to feature our own internship resource page!

Over the last months, we’ve been busy updating the page so that it serves the needs of students like you in the best way possible! It is a work in progress, however, so please do comment with suggestions on how we might expand the page. What are things you wish you could see more of on the resources page, and on the blog overall?

In addition to drawing attention to our Resources page, I think it’s appropriate to include a few tips on finding and securing a job or internship. Now is the time!

One of the greatest things about being in a publishing program like Pace’s is the fact that being here puts you in the middle of people who are moving in the same general direction as you. As I’ve been told in multiple classes, “your classmates will be your friends and colleagues in the industry. Get to know them.” It’s important that each student take advantage of the circles they are in, but also that they expand beyond it. Another great part about the program is that your professors and staff are active in the field, which means you have direct connections that will go a long way in securing your first job or internship–if you take advantage of them.

So for tips:

1. Be Creative in your Approach
Applying online the way a publisher or company requests is exactly what everyone else is doing. Consider how you might engage with them differently; perhaps Twitter and Facebook are your friends in this case. Thinking outside the box in your approach to securing a job or internship is a perfect way to put your skills on exhibit in the public sphere!

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2. Keep Your Options Open
Tailoring your options to what you think you will like may limit where you’re applying. Desperation is an excellent motivator, and sometimes you just need to get your foot in the door somewhere. The publishing industry may be difficult to break into, but it’s possible if you are dedicated to it. As the Society of Young Publishers advises,

Don’t set your mind on one job – any experience in publishing is valuable – even working on a book publisher’s reception (you get to know the names, companies, authors that your employer deals with). Also, knowledge of other areas of publishing – e.g. marketing or sales – could be highly beneficial for your job in editorial, because as an Editor, you will need to take a keen interest in the market and sales and production of your titles. You also might find out that you prefer different areas of publishing rather than your first career choice. Remember any experience that you can get is valuable.

So don’t let a job or internship title dissuade you! Unless you loathe marketing or sales, don’t rule them out as options.

3. Networking, and More Networking
And finally, courtesy of Margaret Maloney’s blog, here are a few tips on networking strategy:

  • Find someone you want to meet
  • Contact that person
  • Use your interview to learn more
  • Write thank-you notes immediately

Be sure to check out her entire post for more details.

Many tips out there on the internet are great, acting as general guidelines for how to approach this entire process. However, be sure to take yourself into consideration because you’re the most important element of the equation. You bring something unique to the table, and it’s your job to figure that out and present it well.

Good luck to those of you on the hunt!

Around Town: Book and Magazine Events in NYC

around-town2September 25th, 2pm
Higgins Hall Auditorium (018), Pratt Institute, 1 St. James Place, Brooklyn, NY 
Hilton Als, Writer-in-Residence at the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences and one of the most original thinkers and prose stylists of his generation, will give two public readings at Pratt, on September 18 and 25.

Als is a New York native. He writes for The New Yorker, and has formerly written for the The Village Voice and editor at Vibe magazine.

 

Retrieved from CBC books
Retrieved from CBC books

September 25th, 7pm
The Powerhouse Arena, 37 Main Street (at Water Street), Brooklyn
“If you’ve read Caitlin Moran’s 2011 memoir, How to Be a Woman, you might recognize the girl at the center of her new novel. This rollicking and rather autobiographical book follows young Johanna Morrigan, who’s growing up poor but imaginative in the depressed English city of Wolverhampton. After nervously humiliating herself while reading a prize-winning poem on live television, Johanna decides the only way out is to completely reinvent herself, to build a new girl: Dolly Wilde, hard-drinking, man-crazy music critic in a top hat and thick eyeliner. In this excerpt, Johanna-now-Dolly’s drunken father has driven her to an important assignment: covering an early Smashing Pumpkins gig” (npr books).

Join the launch for Moran’s book, published September 23rd! Attendance is free.

 

September 26-28th, 11am daily.
MoMA PS1, 22-25 Jackson Ave. Long Island City, NY
The NY Art Book Fair is the world’s premier event for artists’ books, catalogs, monographs, periodicals and zines.  Free event.

 

Bad for YouSeptember 27th, 3-4pm
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, South Court Auditorium
Are you the kind of kid who thinks it’s BAD when a graphic novel gets banned?  Then get ready to be totally shocked when you find out there was once a time in this country when comic books were BURNED!

Kevin C. Pyle and Scott Cunningham will be reading from their docu-comic BAD FOR YOU: EXPOSING THE WAR ON FUN, detailing those dark days and more. They have a whole chapter on the stuff adults were once afraid of kids reading—including fears from ancient times about reading itself! You’ll also learn about how scary old fairy tales once were, as well as what keeps getting Harry Potter books banned (hint, it has something to do with the devil).

Join Kevin and Scott for their celebration of Banned Books Week (September 21-27) and find out how much fun BAD can be!

First come, first served!

 

location00_listingOctober 1st, 5-9pm
Franklin Park Bar and Beer Garden, 618 St. Johns Place, Brooklyn, NY 11238.
“Make the Connection”: An evening talk with Michael Miller and Betsy Sussler on breaking into publishing.