Link of the Week: WordRates

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A brand new resource was launched on October 19th, Wordrates.com. WordRates is a publishing platform for journalists to share payment structures, rate editors, and sell pitches. The project was launched on Kickstarter in April 2015 and by May 24,2015 the project reached its goal. They raised almost $10,000. Writer Scott Carney founded the site to bring transparency to the Byzantine world of magazine publishing.

According to Galleycat:

The site contains a database of magazines, blogs and newspapers that work with freelance writers. The entries for these publications include crowd-sourced ratings and comments from writers on the publication, as well as ratings of individual editors. In addition, if you sign up for the free membership, you can access publication details like pay rates, kill fees and advertising rates, along with masthead information. If you sign up for a premium account ($35 for six months, $50 a year), then you can access contact details for individual editors. You can also browse the site by best rated (Wired, Outside, Fast Company) or lowest rated (Details, Town & Country, Allure) or newest/oldest.

One special feature is the Pitchlab. On the site it explains that Pitchlab is where “Writers with great ideas can submit pitches, which are then reviewed by our team of mentors. If the idea passes the review process, the mentor will then work with the writer to hone the proposal into a perfect pitch and then take it out to the marketplace to find an appropriate publication, just like a literary agent does in the book publishing world.”

The site has been described as “Yelp for journalists.”

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Jordan Forney is a Graduate Assistant for the M.S. in Publishing program at Pace University. She is currently pursuing a career in the book publishing industry. She’s a proud alumnus of Seton Hill University and calls the United States Virgin Islands home. 

Link of the Week: Writer’s Almanac

The Writer’s Almanac is a daily radio show and podcast that broadcasts quick tidbits of literary history. The show is hosted by Garrison Keillor (American writer and humorist) and is produced by American Public Media. In an effort to read a wider audience, the information is also represented online in blog format. Each day a new poem followed by important birthdays and moments in writing history are posted. Check out the website for inspiration, talking points, and to read about authors you may not have heard of before. The website is a great resource for all publishing students looking to                                                      reconnect with their love of books.

 

IN THE NEWS: Publishing Article Round-Up

The M.S. in Publishing Blog wants to keep students, faculty and alumni up to date with the latest publishing industry buzz. “In The News” is a new blog feature  that rounds up interesting publishing articles to share with readers!  This installment features two articles discussing the future of book publishing and recent cover design winners. 

 

 The Huffington Post article, The Future of the Novelby Warren Adler, discusses a topic that countless readers have come to consider “normal,” the genre changes made to the modern novel.  “With the tsunami of e-books where traditional and self-published writers are beefing up reading choices to astounding levels,” Adler says, “the book business has become a competing stew of infinite taste sensations that are offered up increasingly sliced and diced, and composed for an increasing segmented reading public.”  The reading population has certainly seen a rise in new book categories stemming from the once traditional genres.  Fiction’s romance aspect can now be further broken down into Romantic Interest, Paranormal, Regency, Suspense, and Young Adult to name a few.  Adler notes that authors try to “skew their stories to a series approach, attempting to “hook” a reader to a character…to keep readers engaged and sales perking.”  Authors are using their writing and content to help the crucial sales and marketing departments bring success to a title and publishing house.   Famous writers like James Patterson pioneered this movement, building what Adler and other industry professionals would call a “book factory that churns out products on multiple platforms.”  Often, ghostwriters are included in this process, expanding a book idea or plot.  Commercial book publishers will rely on the emerging technological developments and reader-based trends to discover where the industry is headed next!

 

In the Best Book Designs 2011: Design Observer Names Winners,” we honor a category of publishing often, subconsciously, overlooked- design.  The Best Book Designs are named by a 35-person advisory panel from ‘Design Observer’, a leading website in design criticism.  ‘Design Observer’ announced the “50 Books / 50 Covers” competition last year to help discover the best innovative book designs.  Scribner’s book “Bed” by David Whitehouse, made the list, which uses a simple photograph of the word “bed” spelled out in different color pillows.  “Better By Mistake,” featuring three chunky erasers with the titled printed on, was selected from Riverhead Books’, written by Alina Tugend.  Other winners include “A Man of Parts” by David Lodge, Scholastic’s “Wonderstruck” by Brian Selznick, “The Pale King” by David Foster Wallace and Alfred A. Knopf’s “Adam and Evelyn,” by Ingo Schulze.  Of the impressive list, my favorite cover design was “Debt,” a Melville House title, by David Graeber.   The minimalistic cover displayed a bright red background and printed receipt.  Now that the 2011 Winners have been revealed, the competition has begun for the 2012 designs.  It should be very interesting to watch the change in design and observe the trends from year to year.

By: Diana Cavallo

Link of the Week: Kevin O. McLaughlin’s Blog

Kevin O. McLaughlin started blogging in order to achieve his dream of learning and shaping a new career as a professional author. Generally speaking, he uses his blog to write about writing as a profession, an industry, and to showcase his own work. In today’s digital age, blogging is a very resourceful tactic because it is a simple way to broadcast one’s name. McLaughlin posts relevant content four to five times per week, and every entry is interesting and inviting. He aspires to inform, entertain, and maybe even enlighten others who are traveled down the same road to literary success.

http://kevinomclaughlin.com/

Link of the Week: Nathan Bransford’s Blog

There are countless blogs about publishing available to the curious reader, but a few stand out from the crowd.  One stand-out blog is written by Nathan Bransford, an author, former literary agent, and current social media manager at CNET.  Bransford has written two Jacob Wonderbar books, and previously worked for Curtis Brown Ltd.  He has put this variety of experience to great use in his blog, posting about topics ranging from “How to Write a Query Letter” to “Why Some E-Books Cost More Than the Hardcover.”  Keeping up on industry news, Bransford also periodically publishes a post on “The Last Few Weeks In Books,” where he examines new titles and current events in publishing.  His posts are well-researched, informative, interesting, and easy to read, culminating in a blog that is equally useful to experienced professionals and newcomers to the business.

http://blog.nathanbransford.com/

Faculty in the Spotlight: Professor Melissa Rosati

The M.S. in Publishing Blog team is proud to announce a new regular feature, which will highlight the accomplishments of faculty and advisory board members from the program. We hope you enjoy our first installment of  “Faculty in the Spotlight!”

For this exciting new blog feature, we would like to celebrate one of the talented members of the M.S. in Publishing Department’s faculty team – Professor Melissa A. Rosati. As well as teaching such courses as Principles in Publishing and Book Sales & Distribution, Professor Rosati is a certified professional co-active coach (CPCC) and the owner and CEO of Melissa’s Coaching Studio and Melissa’s Social Media Studio, LLC.

Professor Rosati’s clients are writers, artists, and social entrepreneurs. With a keen interest in creativity and digital issues, she develops coaching programs to help people enrich their strategies and skills. As appropriate for the needs of an organization or an individual client, Professor Rosati formulates social networking/marketing strategies and facilitates hands-on training.

As a former publishing executive, Professor Rosati brings a solid background in editorial, marketing, and publicity to her coaching and consulting clients. Her professional experience, with publishers such as McGraw-Hill International (UK), Routledge, and HarperCollins College, is in strategic planning, reorganization, partnerships, content acquisition, online products, contract negotiation, staff training and development, and publishing in international markets. Furthermore, Professor Rosati co-leads the U.S. – China Publishing Dialogues at Pace University, where she co-facilitates executive training for publishers throughout China. She is also a co-founder of Writers, Readers, and Publishers: Present Tense, Future Bold, a thought-leadership group about the role of publishing in our culture and society. In addition, she is the host of Creativity Matters Now, an internet radio show.

When Professor Rosati is not teaching, coaching, or consulting, she spends her time writing. In particular, she blogs about different aspects of the overall publishing industry. One post, entitled, “It’s Not Your Great Grandma’s Publishing Industry, or Is It?” relates to the course she is teaching this semester, Book Sales & Distribution. The entry discusses the differences between publishing in the past and publishing in the present; Professor Rosati ruminates on “your great grandma’s” reading habits as compared to your habits, as an individual living in the digital age. For more of Professor Rosati’s compelling blog entries, please read, “Writers Are a Consumer Class” and “We’ll Always Have Bookstores.”

Link of the Week: Alan Rinzler’s Blog

In every industry, there are people who think they are experts. Then there are people who are actual experts and know their field. The publishing industry is home to one such expert: Alan Rinzler. He is a consulting editor who has been lucky enough to work with writers as an editor and publisher for more than 46 years. In his time as an editor and publisher, he experienced the ups and downs of the industry and has formed his opinion of what it takes to succeed in the business. To this effect, he has written numerous blog posts on a multitude of topics, such as: when you need an editor, what authors can learn from bestseller lists, and social media website advice. Before you enter the publishing field as an author, check out some of his blogs, and you may learn a thing or two about publishing!

http://alanrinzler.com/