Link of the Week: Literature for the Halibut

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Screen Shot 2015-04-15 at 4.44.31 PMReading is something that ought to be done every day, but we all have days when we’re too busy to delve into the pages of a book. Whether we are running around doing errands or traveling, there’s time to listen, at the very least, to books or podcasts. But there’s also the option to listen to radio shows. I know, I know… who listens to radios these days? The good thing is, radio shows aren’t necessarily limited to the radio waves anymore! Much like a podcast, a radio show can stream or the archives can be downloaded for later listening.

One such radio show that may interest you bookish people is Literature for the Halibut, where Ann Haubrich, Jason Braun, Nicky Rainey and MK Stallings take listeners on a “literary fishing excursion.” From 9-10pm every Monday night, KDHX broadcasts literary nibbles or excerpts, all of which can be accessed on their website archive here.

Take a listen!

Link of the Week! VIDA: Women in Literary Arts

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Equality for women in the workplace, and in society at large, has been an issue for a long time now. Movements have come and gone, bringing change to our world. One of publishing’s shortcomings is the imbalance of men and women in high leadership positions, and further, a lack of diversity.

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One volunteer group has been tackling the issue of awareness head-on. VIDA is “a research-driven organization” that strives to “increase critical attention to contemporary women’s writing as well as further transparency around gender equality issues in contemporary literary culture” (Source). Every year, this group collects data from “Tier 1” journals, publications, and other top literary presses in order to represent, in hard numbers, the disparities among writers and other participants of the literary world.

The VIDA Count reveals major imbalances at premiere publications both in the US and abroad. For example: The New York Review of Books covered 306 titles by men in 2010 and only 59 by women; The New York Times Book Review covered 524 books by men compared to 283 books written by women (VIDA Count 2010). ~About VIDA

The VIDA count has been an annual event since 2010; a little earlier in the week the 2014 results were published. For the first time, the VIDA conducted a Women of Color count, and for the second year a Larger Literary Landscape count. Read the full report here. The efforts that VIDA is making to illuminate the disparities in the literary world is bringing awareness to a wide population, and hopefully change to balance the inequalities.

 

Click here to find out more about VIDA!

 

 

Link of the Week: The Writer’s Almanac

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An almanac is traditionally classified as an annual publication or “an annual calendar containing important dates and statistical information such as astronomical data and tide tables.” They provide a place to consolidate information so that it can be easily accessible to those who want it.

The Writer’s Almanac features daily updates that follow “on this day in history” highlights, like those that you might find in a newspaper. In the case of the WA, subscribers or site visitors can read (or listen to) a few poems and historical highlights pertaining to literature and the authors of it. The host of the WA also features famous authors on their birthdays, and details their work and lives.

You can subscribe to the email list, follow them on Twitter or Facebook, or download their podcasts from iTunes, the Swell app, or iHeartRadio for iPhone and Android.

Also on the WA website, you can find a series of interviews with poets. Take some time to read about these authors and their work!

 

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Link of the Week: Penguin’s “Wheel of Fortune”

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This year Penguin is turning 80, and as with most big milestone birthdays, it’s not a surprise that the company wants to do something big to commemorate the event.

Eighty years is a long time to be in business, and even with the merger with Random House, Penguin has a legacy to celebrate. This year, they’re incorporating the digital side of publishing, showing the world that they’re taking steps to become integrated and relevant.

Penguin has launched an interactive website that introduces users to 80 classical works.

 

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Click Here to check out the official Little Black Classics webpage.

By dragging or clicking the Penguin “selection tool,” users are introduced to titles with a quote from the title they land on and the option to purchase it as either a Mass Market paperback or eBook. Users can also share their finds on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

More than anything, Penguin is showing itself capable of engaging readers in the digital age, and interested in

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moving forward with new ideas and approaches to bookselling. It may be hard for old companies to adjust to change, especially the change happening so quickly these days, but Penguin is making a salient effort that demands they be paid attention to.

 

Click here for further reading on Penguin’s history of changing the book world.

Link of the Week: Scribner’s New Online Magazine

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Originally launched in 1887, Scribner Magazine introduced new authors and published short form pieces by the authors who were published by Scribner, such as Henry James, Edith Wharton, Theodore Roosevelt, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Ernest Hemingway. In 1939, the magazine discontinued its circulation due to low numbers (in comparison to Atlantic Monthly and Harper’s Monthly).

Today, Scribner has announced the relaunch of the magazine, but this time, in a digital format. In keeping with its original purpose, the new Scribner Magazine intends to “pull back the curtain, to reveal a more intimate look at writers and publishers: where writers work, the music they listen to, the seeds of their books” (Source).

 

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Click to visit the Magazine

 

According to Publishers Weekly, “The online magazine will include original writing and interactive media, prose and audiobook excerpts, photo galleries, author-curated music playlists, bookseller reviews, and insider looks at the world of publishing. The first edition kicks off with an essay from Anthony Doerr, about the writing of his novel, All The Light We Cannot See, a 2014 National Book Award finalist” (Source).
Take some time to check out the articles and reviews in the magazine!