15 Stellar Short Stories You Can Read Online This Month

Following April’s National Poetry Month’s celebration, readers can look forward to a Summer of beach reading. But, in between these two reading seasons is National Short Story Month, a form of writing dedicated to in the month of May.

The Huffington Post has compiled a list of 15 short stories that viewers can read online to kick off their summer reading lists. “These make for great lunch break reads,” as the writer, Maddie Crum, says.

Among the stories the made the list include:

The 37” by Mary Miller

Anthologized in Miller’s recent collection Always Happy Hour, this story follows a girl trying to get home to see her mother in Mississippi.

• “You Are Happy?” by Akhil Sharma

A boy observes his mother’s decent into alcoholism in Shamra’s story, which will appear in his collection out this summer.

• “A Hundred and Twenty Muscles” by Rachel Heng

In another great work of flash fiction, a young girl plays with her class pet ― a rabbit named Domino ― a little too violently.

Pace University’s MS in Publishing Program Hosts the China Publishing Group

In September, Pace University’s MS in Publishing program hosted a delegation from the Beijing-based China Publishing Group (中国出版集团公司). cpgFormed in 2002 when China joined the World Trade Organization, CPG now publishes more than 16,000 new titles annually, including ebooks and audiovisuals. It also delivers information services online and in print. According to Publishers Weekly, CPG reported revenues of US$1.4 billion, profits of US$138.5 million, and total assets of US$2.7 billion in 2015.

CPG is headed by Mr. Tan Yue (谭跃), a big advocate of managerial training and development as a source of innovation and competitive advantage. CPG conducts ongoing scientific research in publishing technology so that its printing and copying facilities remain state of the art for both print and electronic media.

This is Pace’s fourth executive program for CPG. Participating were Mr. Tan’s top managers from fourteen business units:

  • China National Publications Import & Export Corp. (CNPIEC), which oversees the import of foreign books, the licensing of Chinese-language translation rights to foreign titles, and the export of Chinese-language books and translation rights to China’s best titles
  • China Publishing & Media Holdings Corporation
  • China Publishing & Media Journal
  • China Translation Corporation
  • Commercial Press International, Ltd., established in 1897, the oldest publishing house in modern China
  • CPG Digital Media Co., Ltd. (including its audiobook division)
  • Encyclopedia of China Publishing House, Ltd., led by the head of the delegation, Mr. LIU Guohui (刘国辉)
  • Orient Publishing Center
  • People’s Literature Publishing House
  • Rong Bao Zhai Publishing House
  • SDX Joint Publishing Company, Ltd.
  • Sino-Culture Press
  • Xinhua United Distribution Group Corporation, which oversees the Xinhua Bookstore chain of over 200 stores
  • Zhonghua Book Company established in 1912

china publishing groupCo-directed by professors Xiaochuan Lian and Kirsten Sandberg, the three-week program focused on the future of publishing, particularly trends in digital strategy, content marketing, and operations; digital rights management, intellectual property law, smart contracts, and blockchain technology; and innovation through incubation, integration, partnership, and acquisition.

Bloomberg, RosettaBooks, and Simon & Schuster each hosted the delegation for tea, tour, and talk. Guest lecturers included publishing professionals at the top of their game (listed alphabetically):

cpg group awardsThe executives received their certificates of program completion from Sherman Raskin, professor and director of the publishing program, Dr. Nira Herrmann, dean of Dyson College, and Dr. Uday Sukhatme, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs for Pace University. Assisting throughout the program were graduate students Mr. Li Zhongke and Miss Wang Qingke, with support from their classmates Anna Bailey, Kevin Mercado, and Breana Swinehart.

Many thanks to all who participated!

Written by: Kirsten Sandbergsandberg

Find her full bio here!

Penguin Classics: Cover to Cover Book Launch

On Tuesday, September 27, the students in the Magazine Production and Design course got the chance to go to the opening lecture in the Labor, Literature and Landmark Lectures Series at the General Society Library, founded in 1785. The lecture was in honor of the 70th anniversary of Penguin Classics and the launch of a new book, Classic Penguin: Cover to cover to coverCover. Elda Rotor, Vice President and Publisher of Penguin Classics, and Paul Buckley, Senior Vice President and Executive Creative Director, spoke about the process of creating the covers for the Penguin Classics.

The lecture started with a simple question: “What makes a classic?” After sharing her opinion that classics are the books that have had readers in the past, and will be guaranteed to have readers in the future, Rotor moved on to discussing specific projects and covers that have been created by Penguin Classics. Buckley said that they wanted to “let the titles do the work,” and that the typography should encapsulate the “flavor of the book.”

Rotor and Buckley also discussed the new use of Penguin’s traditional orange and white tri-band, which has never before been used in American publications by Penguin, in the Penguin Orange Collection. Buckley discussed how he wanted to add a new level of creativity to the basic design by adding additional dimensions, like having images weaving in and out of the bands. This is something that we all strive to do with cover design: maintain the traditional branding of books and magazines, keep the recognizable images, while also finding something new to do with the old designs.

When discussing books like Lord of the Flies and The Haunting of Hill House, Rotor and Buckley talked about finding the right imagery to accompany the book. Even though the final covers are not always what they originally imagine, but they always end up being the perfect representations of the books. For example, in discussing The Haunting of Hill House, the house is actually barely scene in the far background of the cover, which instead dramatically depicts a single pivotal scene from the book in the forest.

Elda Rotor, VP, Publisher, Penguin Classics, with Pace students at the book launch.
Elda Rotor, VP, Publisher, Penguin Classics, with Pace students at the book launch.

Rotor and Buckley’s lecture on cover design at Penguin Classics covered topics of science fiction books, horror books, international books, collections and series of books, and even touched on the process of dealing with authors and estates. However, what it really boiled down to was the importance of the cover for a book. As Rotor put it, the cover is “sparking [the reader’s] imagination and curiosity,” as their first impression of the book ultimately comes from the cover. After the lecture, copies of the new book Classic Penguin: Cover to Cover, were available for purchase and signing. It was truly a great experience to be able to hear from the people that really work hard to make sure the visual of a book is stunning. It was a great learning experience that the Magazine Production and Design class had the unique opportunity to experience.

Kevin BakerWritten by: Kevin Baker

Kevin Baker is a graduate student studying magazine publishing at Pace University, with a particular interest in design and editorial work. In the past, he has worked as an intern at his undergraduate college magazine at York College of Pennsylvania, YC Magazine​, as an writing, proofreading, and fact-checking intern.

PW Publishing Industry Salary Survey 2016


Publishers Weekly has recently posted their annual Salary Survey for the Publishing Industry.

For anyone looking into careers in the publishing industry, it helps to research the current atmosphere and understand what you’re getting yourself into. The Salary Surveys are a good tool to use to see what the statistics are and what overall salaries look like so you can have a better understanding of what you should be negotiating for when you look at job offers, what job security looks like, details to better help you plan for the long-term, and so on. It’s interesting to note that the Salary Surveys seem to have similar problems every year—racial diversity is severely lacking, men make more than women, there’s an overall dissatisfaction with pay and too much work with no recognition or advancement. Perhaps if we’re more aware of these changes that need to be made, as we move into the industry we can be more cognizant of what we can do to make these statistics shift in a positive direction.

Besides Publishers Weekly, some other useful sites to consider while searching down the Google-rabbit hole for information on salaries in publishing are PayScale and GlassDoor.