Looking for a Spring Internship?

Alright, everyone. This is a long post, but a really important one. If you’re hoping to intern at a book, magazine, or media company in the spring, now’s the time to start looking at PUB 699A, a.k.a. Internship I. In the fall and spring, internships run the length of the semester and students are required to intern 16-24 hours/week. (Summer internships, by contrast, are typically 35-40 hours/week and run from June through August.)

Professor Denning, Executive Director of Internships and Corporate Outreach, is the M.S. in Publishing program’s go-to contact for internships. Need help writing a resume or cover letter? Contact Professor Denning. Want to talk through the applications process? Contact Professor Denning. Found the perfect publisher but can’t find an internship position? CONTACT PROFESSOR DENNING.

The semester before registering for PUB 699A, all students are required to meet with Professor Denning. Feel free to book an appointment with her here: jdenning@pace.edu.

Also be sure to browse the tabs at the top of the blog for Magazine/Digital Media Internship resources and Book Internship Resources. You can also click here to download the Course Descriptions for Internship I & II. [Word, 3.4 MB]

Over the course of the semester, we will be featuring a variety of book, magazine, and digital publishers that offer exciting internships. This week's post focuses on the Big 5. 

 

Internships with the Big 5

*Please read this in conjunction with our Internship I & II post.

HACHETTE BOOK GROUP

Each year, Hachette Book Group (HBG) publishes more than 1,400 adult books, 300 YA/children’s books, and 450 audio books. HBG headquarters is located in New York City, but satellite offices can be found in Boston, Lebanon (IN), Nashville, Boulder, Philadelphia, and Berkeley. HBG also owns Hachette Book Group Canada, Inc., a marketing and publicity company located in Toronto. Familiar HBG imprints include: Little, Brown & CompanyHachette Books, and Perseus Books.

Fun facts:

  • HBG’s bestselling author list is stacked. James PattersonJ.K. Rowling, Stephen ColbertDavid SedarisTom Wolfe, Stephenie Meyer, and Malcolm Gladwell all write for Hachette imprints.
  • In 2016, 214 HBG books made the New York Times bestseller list (44 of these snagged the top spot at one point or another).
  • Grand Central Publishing, a division of Hachette Book Group, recently acquired Dear Evan Hansen: Through the Window, a behind-the-scenes look at the award-winning musical.

Jobs and PAID internship posts at HBG can be found here. Employment opportunities are broken down into 9 categories: art, distribution, editorial, finance, operations, production, publicity, sales, and subsidiary rights. Job descriptions are listed on the left hand side of the page, with corresponding location information on the right. You can also sign up for HBG job notification emails that alert you to new positions as they  become available.

Simon & Schuster

Richard L. (Dick) Simon and Max Lincoln Schuster were some of the first entrepreneurs to approach publishing from a marketing standpoint. From the very beginning, S&S spent five to ten times more money on advertising and promotion than their competitors, and it was the first publishing house to apply mass-market production and distribution techniques to books. In 1939, with the help of Robert Fair de Graff – a founder and former president of Pocket Books – the company brought about “the paperback revolution.” Today, Simon & Schuster, Inc. manages a number of divisions and imprints. In its adult publishing division, familiar imprint names include Gallery, Scribner, and Touchstone; in its children’s publishing division, familiar imprints include Aladdin, Little Simon, and Beach Lane Books. Today, S&S is part of the CBS Corporation with international companies in Australia, Canada, India, and the UK.

Fun facts:

  • Simon & Schuster publishes many recognizable entertainment brands like Pocket Books’ Star Trek® and MTV Books.
  • In 2016, Simon and Schuster’s Children’s Division introduced Salaam Reads, believed to be the first imprint focused on Muslim characters and stories.
  • Simon & Schuster is home to many recognizable stories for young readers like Peanuts, Olivia, and Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood.

Interns are placed “within specific imprints or divisions on either the adult or children’s side of the business based on interest, experience, academic coursework, and Simon & Schuster business needs. Past assignments have typically been within editorial, marketing, and publicity departments.” Each year, S&S has three 10-week internship programs in the summer, fall, and spring. The summer session is 35 hours/week, while fall and spring sessions are 16-20 hours/week (designed to accommodate academic schedules). Interns are PAID by the hour, and are required to fill out a weekly time sheet.

Applications for Simon & Schuster’s spring season open in December. For more internship information, click here.

HarperCollins

HarperCollins was founded in 1817 by brothers James and John Harper. Headquartered in New York City, the company has publishing operations in more than 18 countries and 120+ imprints around the world. Some of its more popular imprints include HarperCollins 360, HarperOne, HarperTeen, and HarperCollins Children’s Books. Between these imprints, HarperCollins publishes around 10,000 new books ever year in 17 languages. They have a print and digital catalog of more than 200,000 titles.

 

Fun facts:
  • HarperCollins has gone through a number of name changes in the past 200 years.
  • HarperCollins authors have won the Nobel Prize, the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, the Newbery and Caldecott Medals, and the Man Booker Prize.
  • Well-known authors include: Veronica Roth, Kiera Cass, Amy Zhang, Jodi Lynn Anderson, Robin Talley, and Lauren Oliver.

HarperCollins Spring internships open for applications in December. For more information, click here.

Macmillan Publishing was founded by Daniel and Alexander Macmillan in London in 1843. It has a number of imprints across the globe. Some of their U.S. publishers include Farrar, Straus and Giroux; Henry Holt and Company; Picador; St. Martin’s Press; Tor/Forge; Macmillan Audio; and Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group. Many of these publishers are based in New York City.

Fun facts:

  • Many of Macmillan’s publishers reside in the iconic Flatiron Building on 23rd Street and Broadway near Madison Square.
  • Macmillan has a number of podcasts available for public consumption like Steal the Stars, Feminasty, Rossen to the Rescue, Dig if you Will, and Rocket Talk.
  • Well-known authors include: Wendy Walker, Jeff Rossen, Elizabeth Bear, Sarah Gailey, and Thomas Moore.

For more information on job opportunities and internships, click here.


Penguin Random House

Penguin Random House was established on July 1, 2013 when Penguin Group and Random House merged. Today, the company is home to almost 250 publishing imprints. Its mission “is to foster a universal passion for reading by partnering with authors to help create stories and communicate ideas that inform, entertain, and inspire, and to connect them with readers everywhere.” Headquartered in New York City, Penguin Random House operates in 20 countries across five continents. It publishes about 70,000 digital and 15,000 print titles every year and has more than 100,000 eBooks available in its catalog.

Fun facts:

Penguin Random House offers internships in the fall, spring, and summer. For more on internships and how to apply, click here.

 

Quote of the Week | Edgar Allan Poe

October is marked by the conspicuous onslaught of Halloween. Stick-on scarecrows pose brokenly in shop windows. Ghostface masks pop-up in drug stores. Pumpkin spice lattes dilute the otherwise smoky smell of the city.

In books, memoirs and biographies are set aside in favor of more mysterious, macabre materials. To jumpstart preparations for the spooky holiday, our Quote of the Week features the man who “became insane with long intervals of horrible sanity.” Ladies and gentleman, Mr. Edgar Allan Poe.

“Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before.” – Edgar Allan Poe, The Raven

Edgar Allan Poe was born in Boston to the British actress Elizabeth Arnold Poe and the American actor David Poe, Jr. When he was three, Poe’s mother died of tuberculosis and his father disappeared; he was thereafter raised by the Richmond-based tobacco merchant John Allan and his wife, Frances Valentine. Poe was writing poetry by the age of 13 and – much to his foster-father’s displeasure – liked to write drafts on the back of Allan’s business papers.

After a not-so-successful career in the military, Poe turned to writing full-time. Looking for opportunities, he lived in New York City, Baltimore, Philadelphia, and Richmond, publishing poems and short stories. In 1835, he started writing for the Southern Literary Messenger.

Original manuscript copy of “Spirts of the Dead”, a poem by Edgar Allan Poe.

Poe made a name for himself writing scathing reviews of his contemporaries’ work. He’s also credited with launching the new genre of detective fiction with “The Murders in the Rue Morgue,” published in 1841. His poem “The Raven,” however, published in 1845, is generally agreed to be the piece that made his career. Ironically enough, the “Father of the Detective Story” died under mysterious circumstances on a train to Philadelphia in 1849.

For more Poe, the “The Black Cat” (1843), “The Tell-Tale Heart” (1843), and “Annabel Lee (1849) are readily available to read online. The Morgan Library & Museum is also hosting an advance screening of the PBS American Masters documentary film Edgar Allan Poe: Buried Alive next Friday, October 20, from 7–10pm. Tickets are free with museum admission. You can watch the trailer here:

Edgar Allan Poe: Buried Alive premieres on the American Masters series Monday, October 30 at 9 pm on THIRTEEN and nationwide on PBS.

 

Link of the Week | Center for Communication



The Center for Communication is a nonprofit organization sponsored by major media companies and other academic partners. It’s mission? To increase diversity in the media industry and better prepare students for careers “by connecting them with the best minds in media.”

Influential figures in the business today, like David J. Barrett, Director of Hearst Corporation, Anthony Ambrosio, Senior Executive Vice President/Chief Administrative Officer (CAO)/Chief Human Resources Officer for CBS Corporation, Julie Henderson, Executive Vice President and Chief Communications Officer for 21st Century Fox, and Hilary Smith, Senior Vice President, Corporate Communications for NBCUniversal, all play a leading role at the Center.

Center for Communication events, namely panels and on-location seminars (195 Plymouth St #320, Brooklyn, NY, 11201), are FREE for students. While most events are open to the public, some are exclusively for students, and these generally require early registration. You can scroll through the Center’s Events Calendar here or you an subscribe to its newsletter for news and updates.

You can also peruse the Center’s website for articles and other resources like “5 WAYS TO PREPARE FOR THE REAL WORLD” and “HOW TO BRAND YOURSELF WITHOUT SPENDING A DIME“.



The Center for Communication annually awards the Carole Cooper and Richard Leibner Journalism Fellowship to a New York-based college junior, senior, or grad student. The Fellow receives a monthly stipend and interns at the Center for Communication during the school year. For more internship listings, check here. (This looks like a broken link right now,  as there aren’t any positions currently available at the Center.)

If you’re just hearing about the Center now and you’re disappointed you’ve missed so many events, fear not. Past events, luncheons, and interviews are posted on vimeo for you to watch at your leisure. For a sample panel, check out this panel on Media Giants and Media Literacy:

 

Quote of the Week |

Mohandas Gandhi

October 2nd marks The International Day of Non-Violence, a 24-hour period set aside by the United Nations to “disseminate the message of nonviolence” and work towards “a culture of peace, tolerance, understanding and nonviolence” throughout the world. The commemoration falls deliberately on the birthday of Mohandas Gandhi, whose nonviolent philosophy of passive resistance helped orchestrate the Indian independence movement. (His work came to a culmination on August 15, 1947 when the Indian Independence Act was made into law.)

In light of recent events, our Quote of the Week features the man whose acts of nonviolent protest inspired human rights movements around the globe, including Martin Luther King Jr.’s civil rights moment in the United States (1954–1968) and Nelson Mandela’s campaign to end apartheid in South Africa (1959–1994).

“If nobody reads the writing on the wall, man will be reduced to the state of the beast, whom he is shaming by his manners.”
― Mahatma Gandhi, The Story of My Experiments With Truth

Gandhi – later known as Mahatma or “the great-souled one” – was born on October 2, 1869 in Porbandar, Kathiawar, India, then a part of the British Empire. At 13, he married Kasturba Makanji, the daughter of a merchant; together, they had four boys: Harilal, Ramdas, Manilal, and Devdas. When he was 18, Gandhi sailed to England to study law. He struggled to find work in India after graduation, and so accepted a one-year legal contract in South Africa. It was here that he was first struck by the unjust treatment of Indian immigrants by the British.

After moving his wife and children to South Africa, Gandhi organized his first civil-disobedience campaign in 1906, which he called “Satyagraha,” or “truth and firmness.” The crusade was coordinated to protest South Africa’s recently-imposed restrictions on the rights of Indians in the country, like the government’s refusal to recognize Hindu marriages. Seven years later, in 1913, the South African government imprisoned hundreds of people from India, including Gandhi. Eventually, “under pressure, the South African government accepted a compromise negotiated by Gandhi and General Jan Christian Smuts that included recognition of Hindu marriages and the abolition of a poll tax for Indians.”

This was just the start of a prodigious life rooted in civil disobedience. His  enduring campaigns were made famous by great victories, like the 24-day Salt March in 1930 (protesting Britain’s Salt Acts, which prevented people in India from collecting or selling salt), the “Quit India” movement in 1942 (which called for Britain’s immediate withdrawal from India), and other lifelong efforts to remove India from imperialist influence.

On January 30, 1948, Gandhi was assassinated by a Hindu fundamentalist in Delhi.

Today, various anthologies of Gandhi’s writings are available to read. His autobiography, The Story of My Experiments With Truth, describes his life from early childhood to 1921. On the work: “Gandhi was a fascinating, complex man, a brilliant leader and guide, a seeker of truth who died for his beliefs but had no use for martyrdom or sainthood. His story, the path to his vision of Satyagraha and human dignity, is a critical work of the twentieth century, and timeless in its courage and inspiration.”